Unified Interior Regions

Maine

Maine is the northernmost and least densely populated state in the contiguous United States east of the Great Lakes. It is known for its jagged rocky coastline; low rolling mountains; heavily forested interior and picturesque waterways. Geologists describe this type of landscape as a "drowned coast", where a rising sea level has invaded former land features, creating bays out of valleys.

New England Water Science Center - Maine

New England Water Science Center - Maine

196 Whitten Rd
Augusta, ME 04330

Phone: 207 622-8201

New England Water

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

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USGS science for a changing world logo
February 3, 2004

 

Because of an increasing awareness of the critical role of ground water in sustaining coastal populations, economies, and ecosystems, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has recently published a report that describes ground water conditions in freshwater and saltwater environments along the Atlantic coast. 

USGS
December 3, 2003

"Warm" is hardly the first word most of us would think of when contemplating Central Maine’s winter weather. Yet, a recent study by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), published in the November issue of the journal Climatic Change, suggests what long-time residents have suspected; winter in Central Maine just isn’t quite what it used to be.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 23, 2003

 

New England’s historic long, harsh winters are often the stuff of legends from long-time residents who swear the weather was worse when they were young. It turns out they may well be right. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have found evidence in the region’s rivers that lends credence to the notion that the winters were once longer.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 23, 2003

Modern wastewater treatment, environmental protection laws, road de-icing salts, and the shift from an agricultural to an urban-based society have resulted in significant changes during the past hundred years in the water quality of three major rivers in New England, according to a report released by the U.S. Geological Survey. 

USGS
July 23, 2003

New England’s historic long, harsh winters are often the stuff of legends from long-time residents who swear the weather was worse when they were young. It turns out they may well be right. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have found evidence in the region’s rivers that lends credence to the notion that the winters were once longer. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 8, 2003

A study by the U.S. Geological Survey has found that potentially more than 103,000 people who use private wells for drinking water in parts of eastern New England could have water supplies with arsenic levels that are higher than federal standards.

USGS
November 5, 2001

America’s coastal states, the states bordering the Great Lakes, and the Pacific and Caribbean island territories, are experiencing increasingly severe coastal erosion and a variety of other coastal hazards. Most of the hazards are natural, but unwise coastal development and poorly designed manmade alterations have increased the risk of damage to life and property.

USGS
January 3, 2000

A minor earthquake, preliminary magnitude 3.5 according to the U.S. Geological Survey, occurred 15 miles (20 km) west northwest of Lewiston, Maine at 4:06 pm Eastern Standard Time (EST). This shallow earthquake was felt in Augusta, and throughout southern Maine. The USGS has received no reports of damage at this time.

USGS
October 4, 1999

While sulfur levels (an indicator of acidity) in rain and streams have declined at locations in Maine, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania and Virginia, the alkalinity of stream water has not recovered at sites in four of the five states according to a new report by the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of the Interior.

USGS
September 8, 1999

Drought conditions have stretched from the mid-Atlantic states through New England and into Maine. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) monitors these conditions by collecting streamflow and ground-water data. The following paragraphs summarize the current levels of streamflow and ground water in the Maine.

USGS
August 6, 1999

Drought conditions have stretched from the mid-Atlantic states through New England and into Maine. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) monitors these conditions by collecting streamflow and ground-water data. The following paragraphs summarize the current levels of streamflow and ground-water in the Maine.

USGS
April 29, 1999

Water quality has improved significantly in New England over the past 50 years because of advances in the treatment of municipal and industrial wastes.

New England Water Science Center - Maine

New England Water Science Center - Maine

196 Whitten Rd
Augusta, ME 04330

Phone: 207 622-8201

New England Water