Unified Interior Regions

Montana

Welcome to the Midwest Region! Our region includes 18 Science Centers in 11 States from the Great Lakes to the Dakotas, south to Missouri and Kentucky. Our streamgage network is used to monitor and assess water resources across the region. Other research focuses on fisheries and aquatic ecosystems, midcontinental plant/animal species, invasive species, wildlife disease, and energy and mining.

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Scientists from the Center work in the northern Rocky Mountains and across the U.S. Many work throughout the world on issues as diverse as global climate change, aquatic ecology, wildlife diseases, bison ecology, and large carnivores.

Go to NOROCK

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's hydrologists, engineers, geospatial analysts, hydrologic technicians, geologists, and support staff work to provide hydrologic data and interpretive studies.

Go to Center

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 192
Date published: April 8, 2016

Grinnell Glacier from South Moraine

This pair of photographs from Grinnell Glacier’s southeast edge shows the dramatic change in the glacier’s volume and area. Note the glacier’s depth along the headwall and its extent at the terminal moraine in the historic photograph.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 8, 2016

Grinnell Glacier from partial North Moraine

North moraine of Grinnell Glacier. In 1924 the glacier’s ice margin was still in proximity to its lateral moraine .

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Grinnell Glacier from North Moraine, 1922 - 2008

View from north moraine of Grinnell Glacier.

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the public domain and may be reproduced without permission.  Images with restrictions are noted below the downloadable image.

Please respect the photographer: When using...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Grinnell Glacier Mather Overlook, 1920 - 2008

The 1920 photo shows National Park Service Director, Steven Mather, on Piatt Path near present day Grinnell Glacier Overlook. A man strikes a similar pose in the 2008 repeat photograph.

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the public domain and may be reproduced without...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Grinnell Glacier Overlook 1940 - 2013

Grinnell Glacier taken from the Grinnell Glacier Overlook off the Highline Trail, Glacier National Park. The view of Grinnell Glacier taken circa 1940 shows the early formation of Upper Grinnell Lake, a proglacial lake visible at the terminus of the glacier. The 2013 photo shows a dramatic increase in the size of the lake as a result of melting ice. 

Image Use...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Grinnell Glacier Overlook - Portrait 1910 - 2013

Portrait image of Grinnell Glacier taken from the Highline Trail, Glacier National Park. 

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the public domain and may be reproduced without permission.  Images with restrictions are noted below the downloadable image.

...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Grinnell Glacier from the summit of Mount Gould 1941 - 2013

This is a view of Grinnell Glacier from the summit of Mount Gould. 

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the public domain and may be reproduced without permission.  Images with restrictions are noted below the downloadable image.

Please respect the...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Grinnell Glacier from Lake Josephine, 1914 - 1938 - 2008

Grinnell Glacier from the shore of Lake Josephine in 1914, 1938, and 2008. 

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the public domain and may be reproduced without permission.  Images with restrictions are noted below the downloadable image.

Please respect...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Grinnell Glacier from footbridge 1920-2008

In addition to the change in the size of Grinnell Glacier, there is obvious change in the foreground streamside vegetation between these two images. 

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the public domain and may be reproduced without permission.  Images with restrictions...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Grinnell Glacier from footbridge 1887-2008

Among the earliest photos of Grinnell Glacier, this 1887 image shows the immense extent and depth of the glacier at the turn of the 20th century. The glacier has responded to temperature and precipitation in the past 100 years, resulting in it’s obvious reduction in size. 

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Grinnell Glacier from trail 1911-2008

Nearly a century after Stanton’s photograph was taken, Grinnell Glacier has receded into it’s cirque basin and is no longer visible from the trail above Grinnell Lake. 

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the public domain and may be reproduced without permission.  Images...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Grinnell Glacier from trail 1910-2008

Grinnell Glacier taken from the Grinnell Glacier trail, Glacier National Park. 

Image Use

Most of the repeat photography images available on this website are in the public domain and may be reproduced without permission.  Images with restrictions are noted below the downloadable image.

Please...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Filter Total Items: 259
February 23, 2016

Telemetry by foot

Once a grizzly bear is radio collared, biologists can track its movements with telemetry on foot.   

February 23, 2016

Culvert trap

Biologists place a culvert trap in locations that they need data from.  Field crews will set up the culvert trap and check it daily, usually in the morning, to determine if a bear has been captured.  Additionally, trap doors are checked via radio telemetry. 

February 23, 2016

Culvert trap and bait

Biologists use road-killed ungulates such as deer, elk, or bison as bait in the traps. 

February 23, 2016

At the capture site

At capture sites with road access, biologists drive to a trap with a bear inside to set up for collecting biological data. 

February 23, 2016

An immobilized bear.

Biologists use a syringe pole to immobilize the captured grizzly bear.  It takes approximately 10 minutes for a bear to become immobilized.  

February 23, 2016

Ready to remove from the trap

Biologists have immobilized the bear and prepare to lift it out of the trap and onto the tarp for data collection.  Once on the tarp the bear is easier to move. 

February 23, 2016

Preparing for collection of samples

A biologist prepares to collect biological information from the bear they have captured.  Biologists collect hair samples for genetic analysis, weigh the bear,  and gather numerous measurements of the body, such as the head, paws, claws, teeth, etc.  Overall condition of the bear is assessed as well, including a body fat measurement.

February 23, 2016

Getting the bear's weight

One of the first measurements taken is the bear’s weight using a quadpod and electronic scale. 

February 23, 2016

Getting set up

Biologists are very careful to keep the grizzly bear under shade and protected from the elements while they collect biological data.  Vital signs are monitored throughout the handling period. 

February 23, 2016

Close up

The kerchief over the grizzly bear’s eyes protects it from dust and debris and reduces visual stimulation. The small tubing in its nose, known as a nasal cannula, delivers oxygen to the animal while it is tranquilized.  

February 23, 2016

Assessing body fat percentage of grizzly bear

Field personnel use bioelectrical impedance to assess body fat percentage of captured bears.  The procedure is similar to how body fat is measured in humans and is based on the resistance of body tissues to the flow of a small, harmless electrical signal.  The electrical current is impeded more by fat tissues compared with tissues that are composed mostly of water, thus

...

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Scientists from the Center work in the northern Rocky Mountains and across the U.S. Many work throughout the world on issues as diverse as global climate change, aquatic ecology, wildlife diseases, bison ecology, and large carnivores.

Go to NOROCK

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's hydrologists, engineers, geospatial analysts, hydrologic technicians, geologists, and support staff work to provide hydrologic data and interpretive studies.

Go to Center