Unified Interior Regions

Montana

Welcome to the Midwest Region! Our region includes 18 Science Centers in 11 States from the Great Lakes to the Dakotas, south to Missouri and Kentucky. Our streamgage network is used to monitor and assess water resources across the region. Other research focuses on fisheries and aquatic ecosystems, midcontinental plant/animal species, invasive species, wildlife disease, and energy and mining.

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Scientists from the Center work in the northern Rocky Mountains and across the U.S. Many work throughout the world on issues as diverse as global climate change, aquatic ecology, wildlife diseases, bison ecology, and large carnivores.

Go to NOROCK

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's hydrologists, engineers, geospatial analysts, hydrologic technicians, geologists, and support staff work to provide hydrologic data and interpretive studies.

Go to Center

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 199
Date published: April 12, 2016

Grizzly Bear Family Tree

Building a family tree of grizzly bears can both satisfy our natural curiosity about bear society and answer many ecologically important questions about the ways bears interact with each other and the landscape.

Date published: April 12, 2016

Greg Pederson's Past Projects

This work is interdisciplinary and would not be possible without the collaboration of colleagues and their respective institutions. Research funding over the years has been provided by 1) the U.S. Geological Survey's National Research Program (NRP), the Climate and Land Use Program (CLU), the Southwestern and Alaska Climate Science Center, the Western Mountain Initiative (WMI), and the...

Date published: April 12, 2016

Improving our understanding of forest-road effects on substrate in headwater streams of the Southwest Crown of the Continent

In 2010, Congress established ten decade-long Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program projects to carry out fuel reduction and ecological restoration treatments on public lands across the country. The Southwest Crown of the Continent was selected as one of the locations under this initiative, given the importance of this region to the economic vitality of local communities and the...

Date published: April 12, 2016
Status: Active

Developing stream temperature networks for the Greater Yellowstone to aid in managing aquatic resources under a changing climate

The topographic diversity and extensive area of protected public land within the Greater Yellowstone demonstrate the importance of this region as a natural resource reserve. Understanding the effects of anticipated changes in climate on aquatic resources and means for managing these resources will ultimately require accurate linkages between empirical data and regional climatic patterns. This...

Date published: April 11, 2016

Vegetation - Sperry Glacier

This view of the northeast portion of Sperry Glacier shows evidence of the glacier's recession as well as the advancement of conifer species and other vegetation on the glacial moraines.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Vegetation - Piegan Glacier

These photographs document another aspect of Glacier Park’s dynamic environment, vegetation change. Although Piegan Glacier has not melted noticeably, years of fire suppression and changing climate may have allowed the invasion of conifers in what was an open meadow in the foreground of the 1930 photo. Also, the demise of the ecologically important whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis ) is...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Vegetation - Hidden Lake (b)

Alpine regions along the shores of Hidden Lake (1943 m) show tremendous expansion of vegetation in this photo comparison, especially at the base of Bearhat Mountain.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Vegetation - Logan Pass

Establishment of new growth and expansion of existing sparse vegetation is obvious along the upper ridge line (center of photo). Persistent snowpack in these alpine regions once deterred profusion of growth, but changing climate conditions have permitted these species to expand their range.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Thunderbird Glacier

Thunderbird Glacier, Glacier National Park.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Vegetation - Hidden Lake (a)

Vegetation ingrowth on the penninsula and surrounding lakeshore are evident in this pair of photos.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Swiftcurrent Glacier 1911 - 2013

Swiftcurrent Glacier 1911 - 2013.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Swiftcurrent Glacier from Lookout

Swiftcurrent Glacier from Swiftcurrent Lookout, Glacier National Park

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Filter Total Items: 274
The Garden Wall weather station in Glacier National Park (elev. 7400 feet) is used for avalanche research and forecasting.
December 31, 2016

The Garden Wall weather station in Glacier National Park (elev. 7400)

The Garden Wall weather station in Glacier National Park (elev. 7400 feet) is used for avalanche research and forecasting along the Going-to-the-Sun Road. It records air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and incoming and outgoing shortwave and longwave radiation.

Grinnell Glacier Ridge 2016
September 27, 2016

Grinnell Glacier Ridge 2016

Grinnell Glacier Ridge 2016

Ground point survey with robotic total station and prism and rod techniques, measuring depth of streambed to assess b
July 28, 2016

Ground point survey with total station to measure depth to streambed

Ground point survey with Trimble S6 robotic total station and prism and rod techniques, measuring depth of streambed to assess bridge scour on West Gallatin River near Belgrade, MT

July 27, 2016

Ivanpah Video Clip

The video shows smaller smoking objects (insects). Dark objects (birds) are flying above the tower. We are uncertain of the origin of dark trails following the birds. 
 

July 27, 2016

Ivanpah Video Clip

The video shows small smoking objects (insects) and a larger object (bird) as it begins to smoke when entering the solar flux. The turquoise window is the thermal camera view of this same event.

July 18, 2016

Inside USGS, No. 6, Ken Pierce, Heavy Breathing of Yellowstone Caldera

Dr. Kenneth Pierce studied the geology and geomorphology of the greater Yellowstone area for nearly his entire career with the U.S. Geological Survey. From 1965 to present, Dr. Pierce has mapped glacial deposits, pioneered Quaternary dating techniques, conducted research on the Yellowstone Hot Spot, studied the geothermal areas, explored the geology of archaeological sites

July 18, 2016

Inside USGS, No. 5, Pleistocene Glaciations of Greater Yellowstone

Dr. Kenneth Pierce studied the geology and geomorphology of the greater Yellowstone area for nearly his entire career with the U.S. Geological Survey. From 1965 to present, Dr. Pierce has mapped glacial deposits, pioneered Quaternary dating techniques, conducted research on the Yellowstone Hot Spot, studied the geothermal areas, explored the geology of archaeological sites

Bathymetry survey measuring streambed depths along pier
July 12, 2016

Bathymetry survey measuring streambed depths along bridge pi

Bathymetry survey with Trimble S6 robotic total station, hydrolite single-beam echosounder transducer, and HYPACK software, measuring streambed depths along bridge pier on Beaverhead River in Twin Bridges, MT

An American bullfrog.
June 30, 2016

American bullfrog close-up

An American bullfrom is native to most eastern states, but considered invasive in the moutain west.

Scientist retrieving a fluorometer
June 29, 2016

Fluorometer Retrieval

Research hydrologist Dr. Susannah Erwin retrieves fluorometer from the Upper Missouri River to download dye trace data.

A hydraulic habitat assessment boat in the river
June 29, 2016

Hydraulic Habitat Assessment Boat

A U.S. Geological Survey hydraulic habitat assessment boat in not enough water.

Scientists with headlight looking at samples at night time.
June 29, 2016

Night Sampling

USGS Fish Biologist Dave Combs searches through net contents for larval fish during night sampling on the Upper Missouri River.

Filter Total Items: 134
USGS science for a changing world logo
August 8, 2006

A report published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contains a regional map and an associated database that inventory 36 locations of reported natural asbestos and fibrous amphibole occurrences in the central United States.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 4, 2006

One of every four fishes in streams of 12 western states is non-native, according to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study published in November 2005 in the North American Journal of Fisheries Management. 

USGS
May 4, 2006

One of every four fishes in streams of 12 western states is non-native, according to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study published in November 2005 in the North American Journal of Fisheries Management. And, researchers found, it´s not just that there are a lot of non-native fishes but they are also widespread...

USGS
March 22, 2006

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists with the Global Change Research Project are unveiling a new website featuring a collection of repeat photographs of glaciers in and around Glacier National Park, Montana. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 22, 2006

 

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists with the Global Change Research Project are unveiling a new website featuring a collection of repeat photographs of glaciers in and around Glacier National Park, Montana.

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 31, 2005

Most species of migratory birds in the Northern Hemisphere make two long trips each year, one north for nesting and the other south for the winter. New information collected by USGS scientists shows that individuals of at least one species, the prairie falcon, make three separate long trips each year.

USGS
June 28, 2005

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) announces the recipients of the second year of the Mineral Resources External Research Program, a grant and/or cooperative agreement opportunity designed to support minerals research. The grant award is split among six topics that support the goals of the Mineral Resources Program and deliver products within one year.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 1, 2004

A new map from the U.S. Geological Survey and the Central United States Earthquake Consortium shows that Central States, including Arkansas, Tennessee, Missouri, Kentucky and Indiana are among the most seismically active states east of the Rocky Mountains. More than 800 earthquakes are cataloged on the map that depicts the locations of earthquakes large enough to be felt, since 1699.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 8, 2003

Included this month:

Hurricane Isabel Makes Her Mark on the North Carolina Coast

Mayans in the Everglades?

Submerged Ice Bridge Reveals Ancient Secrets About Alaska

America’s Deepest Coral Reef

Young Tortises on Mojave’s Menu

Measuring Floods From A Distance

Is the World’s Fuel Tank on Empty?

USGS
February 14, 2003

Not long ago, conventional wisdom was that you couldn’t predict the climate for more than a few days in advance. Then came the awareness of El Niño and La Niña and the forecast window increased to as much as 6 to 9 months, depending on the region and season.

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Scientists from the Center work in the northern Rocky Mountains and across the U.S. Many work throughout the world on issues as diverse as global climate change, aquatic ecology, wildlife diseases, bison ecology, and large carnivores.

Go to NOROCK

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's hydrologists, engineers, geospatial analysts, hydrologic technicians, geologists, and support staff work to provide hydrologic data and interpretive studies.

Go to Center