Unified Interior Regions

Montana

Welcome to the Midwest Region! Our region includes 18 Science Centers in 11 States from the Great Lakes to the Dakotas, south to Missouri and Kentucky. Our streamgage network is used to monitor and assess water resources across the region. Other research focuses on fisheries and aquatic ecosystems, midcontinental plant/animal species, invasive species, wildlife disease, and energy and mining.

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Scientists from the Center work in the northern Rocky Mountains and across the U.S. Many work throughout the world on issues as diverse as global climate change, aquatic ecology, wildlife diseases, bison ecology, and large carnivores.

Go to NOROCK

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's hydrologists, engineers, geospatial analysts, hydrologic technicians, geologists, and support staff work to provide hydrologic data and interpretive studies.

Go to Center

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 193
Date published: April 13, 2016
Status: Active

Drivers of Drought in the Upper Colorado River Basin

The purpose of this project is to investigate Colorado River basin droughts, and the role of temperature in influencing runoff efficiency. The project uses paleoclimatic data to extend instrumental climate and flow records, along with projected warming to assess the range of possible conditions that may be expected to occur and to determine how warming temperatures may influence river flow and...

Contacts: Greg Pederson, Connie Woodhouse
Date published: April 13, 2016
Status: Active

Extinction dynamics and microrefugia of the American pika as climate changes.

Accurate projections of climate change and associated impacts on wildlife are now essential to conservation planning, but predictive models of range shifts for many species are often coarse, ignore extinction dynamics, and overestimate suitable habitat. Recent studies suggest the American pika (Ochotona princeps) is vulnerable to increasing heat stress in the Great Basin yet appears more...

Contacts: Aaron Johnston
Date published: April 12, 2016

Grizzly Bear Dispersal

This work has two components. First, we developed a method to use our family tree data to examine dispersal. Next, we would like to apply this method to our updated and more complete family tree to improve our understanding of how grizzly bears disperse.

Date published: April 12, 2016

Predicting changes in Bear Foods

Huckleberries are central to the diets of bears, grouse, and other animals, as well as being a cultural and food resource for humans. Approximately 15% of the diet of bears in the Whitefish range and Glacier National Park is huckleberries, and huckleberries help bears gain weight for hibernation. Changes in climate lead to changes in vegetation phenology, productivity, and quality that may...

Date published: April 12, 2016

Grizzly Bear Family Tree

Building a family tree of grizzly bears can both satisfy our natural curiosity about bear society and answer many ecologically important questions about the ways bears interact with each other and the landscape.

Date published: April 12, 2016

Greg Pederson's Past Projects

This work is interdisciplinary and would not be possible without the collaboration of colleagues and their respective institutions. Research funding over the years has been provided by 1) the U.S. Geological Survey's National Research Program (NRP), the Climate and Land Use Program (CLU), the Southwestern and Alaska Climate Science Center, the Western Mountain Initiative (WMI), and the...

Contacts: Greg Pederson
Date published: April 12, 2016

Improving our understanding of forest-road effects on substrate in headwater streams of the Southwest Crown of the Continent

In 2010, Congress established ten decade-long Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program projects to carry out fuel reduction and ecological restoration treatments on public lands across the country. The Southwest Crown of the Continent was selected as one of the locations under this initiative, given the importance of this region to the economic vitality of local communities and the...

Date published: April 12, 2016
Status: Active

Developing stream temperature networks for the Greater Yellowstone to aid in managing aquatic resources under a changing climate

The topographic diversity and extensive area of protected public land within the Greater Yellowstone demonstrate the importance of this region as a natural resource reserve. Understanding the effects of anticipated changes in climate on aquatic resources and means for managing these resources will ultimately require accurate linkages between empirical data and regional climatic patterns. This...

Date published: April 11, 2016
Status: Active

Repeat Photography Teacher Trunk

This trunk was made possible from a grant from NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement Mission. It is designed to get students thinking about measuring precipitation - snow and ice, as well as rain- not just to do it, but why we would want to do it.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Vegetation - Sperry Glacier

This view of the northeast portion of Sperry Glacier shows evidence of the glacier's recession as well as the advancement of conifer species and other vegetation on the glacial moraines.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Vegetation - Piegan Glacier

These photographs document another aspect of Glacier Park’s dynamic environment, vegetation change. Although Piegan Glacier has not melted noticeably, years of fire suppression and changing climate may have allowed the invasion of conifers in what was an open meadow in the foreground of the 1930 photo. Also, the demise of the ecologically important whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis ) is...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Vegetation - Hidden Lake (b)

Alpine regions along the shores of Hidden Lake (1943 m) show tremendous expansion of vegetation in this photo comparison, especially at the base of Bearhat Mountain.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Filter Total Items: 267
Grinnell Glacier, GNP - 2016 (terminus)
December 31, 2016

Grinnell Glacier, GNP - 2016 (terminus)

Grinnell Glacier, GNP - 2016 (terminus)

Swiftcurrent Glacier 2016 (port)
December 31, 2016

Swiftcurrent Glacier 2016 (port)

Swiftcurrent Glacier 2016 (port)

Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park - 2016
December 31, 2016

Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park - 2016

Grinnell Glacier (J Scurlock, 09/15/16) has retreated to the mostly shaded, upper confines of the basin.   

USGS employees and Flathead National Forest staff dig pits in the snow to examine snow structure and depth in Montana.
December 31, 2016

USGS employees and Flathead National Forest staff dig pits in the snow

USGS employees and Flathead National Forest staff dig pits in the snow to examine snow structure and depth for avalanche research and forecasting in northwest Montana.

Logan Glacier in Glacier National Park - 2016.
December 31, 2016

Logan Glacier in Glacier National Park - 2016.

Large moraines at the base of Logan Glacier (2016) mark the extent of the glacier before it began its retreat around 1850 AD.

The Garden Wall weather station in Glacier National Park (elev. 7400 feet) is used for avalanche research and forecasting.
December 31, 2016

The Garden Wall weather station in Glacier National Park (elev. 7400)

The Garden Wall weather station in Glacier National Park (elev. 7400 feet) is used for avalanche research and forecasting along the Going-to-the-Sun Road. It records air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and incoming and outgoing shortwave and longwave radiation.

Grinnell Glacier Ridge 2016
September 27, 2016

Grinnell Glacier Ridge 2016

Grinnell Glacier Ridge 2016

Ground point survey with robotic total station and prism and rod techniques, measuring depth of streambed to assess b
July 28, 2016

Ground point survey with total station to measure depth to streambed

Ground point survey with Trimble S6 robotic total station and prism and rod techniques, measuring depth of streambed to assess bridge scour on West Gallatin River near Belgrade, MT

July 27, 2016

Ivanpah Video Clip

The video shows smaller smoking objects (insects). Dark objects (birds) are flying above the tower. We are uncertain of the origin of dark trails following the birds. 
 

July 27, 2016

Ivanpah Video Clip

The video shows small smoking objects (insects) and a larger object (bird) as it begins to smoke when entering the solar flux. The turquoise window is the thermal camera view of this same event.

July 18, 2016

Inside USGS, No. 6, Ken Pierce, Heavy Breathing of Yellowstone Caldera

Dr. Kenneth Pierce studied the geology and geomorphology of the greater Yellowstone area for nearly his entire career with the U.S. Geological Survey. From 1965 to present, Dr. Pierce has mapped glacial deposits, pioneered Quaternary dating techniques, conducted research on the Yellowstone Hot Spot, studied the geothermal areas, explored the geology of archaeological sites

July 18, 2016

Inside USGS, No. 5, Pleistocene Glaciations of Greater Yellowstone

Dr. Kenneth Pierce studied the geology and geomorphology of the greater Yellowstone area for nearly his entire career with the U.S. Geological Survey. From 1965 to present, Dr. Pierce has mapped glacial deposits, pioneered Quaternary dating techniques, conducted research on the Yellowstone Hot Spot, studied the geothermal areas, explored the geology of archaeological sites

Filter Total Items: 126
USGS
June 17, 2008

Long-term trends in landscape conditions have significantly reduced sagebrush habitat and populations of greater sage-grouse, according to a new study examining the bird's chances of survival.

USGS
April 10, 2008

North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation.

USGS
July 9, 2007

A report published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contains a regional map and associated database that inventory 61 locations of reported natural asbestos and fibrous amphibole occurrences in the Rocky Mountain area of the United States, including the states of Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, and Wyoming.

USGS
May 9, 2007

People who felt the magnitude 4.6 earthquake that hit Western Montana on May 8 can report their experiences during the temblor at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Web site, "Did You Feel It?" at http://pasadena.wr.usgs.gov/shake/STORE/X2007ccay/ciim_display.html, or go to the USGS Web site http://earthquake.usgs.gov, and click on "Did You Feel It?" 

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 8, 2006

A report published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contains a regional map and an associated database that inventory 36 locations of reported natural asbestos and fibrous amphibole occurrences in the central United States.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 4, 2006

One of every four fishes in streams of 12 western states is non-native, according to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study published in November 2005 in the North American Journal of Fisheries Management. 

USGS
May 4, 2006

One of every four fishes in streams of 12 western states is non-native, according to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study published in November 2005 in the North American Journal of Fisheries Management. And, researchers found, it´s not just that there are a lot of non-native fishes but they are also widespread...

USGS
March 22, 2006

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists with the Global Change Research Project are unveiling a new website featuring a collection of repeat photographs of glaciers in and around Glacier National Park, Montana. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 22, 2006

 

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists with the Global Change Research Project are unveiling a new website featuring a collection of repeat photographs of glaciers in and around Glacier National Park, Montana.

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 31, 2005

Most species of migratory birds in the Northern Hemisphere make two long trips each year, one north for nesting and the other south for the winter. New information collected by USGS scientists shows that individuals of at least one species, the prairie falcon, make three separate long trips each year.

USGS
June 28, 2005

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) announces the recipients of the second year of the Mineral Resources External Research Program, a grant and/or cooperative agreement opportunity designed to support minerals research. The grant award is split among six topics that support the goals of the Mineral Resources Program and deliver products within one year.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Scientists from the Center work in the northern Rocky Mountains and across the U.S. Many work throughout the world on issues as diverse as global climate change, aquatic ecology, wildlife diseases, bison ecology, and large carnivores.

Go to NOROCK

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's hydrologists, engineers, geospatial analysts, hydrologic technicians, geologists, and support staff work to provide hydrologic data and interpretive studies.

Go to Center