Unified Interior Regions

Montana

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 188
Huckleberries are central to the diets of bears, grouse, and other animals, as well as being a cultural and food resource.
Date Published: April 12, 2016

Predicting changes in Bear Foods

Huckleberries are central to the diets of bears, grouse, and other animals, as well as being a cultural and food resource for humans. Approximately 15% of the diet of bears in the Whitefish range and Glacier National Park is huckleberries, and huckleberries help bears gain weight for hibernation. Changes in climate lead to changes in vegetation phenology, productivity, and quality that may...

Contacts: Tabitha Graves
Grizzly family tree.
Date Published: April 12, 2016

Grizzly Bear Family Tree

Building a family tree of grizzly bears can both satisfy our natural curiosity about bear society and answer many ecologically important questions about the ways bears interact with each other and the landscape.

Contacts: Tabitha Graves
Bear grass in Glacier NP.
Date Published: April 12, 2016

Greg Pederson's Past Projects

This work is interdisciplinary and would not be possible without the collaboration of colleagues and their respective institutions. Research funding over the years has been provided by 1) the U.S. Geological Survey's National Research Program (NRP), the Climate and Land Use Program (CLU), the Southwestern and Alaska Climate Science Center, the Western Mountain Initiative (WMI), and the...

Contacts: Greg Pederson
Muddy forest road.
Date Published: April 12, 2016

Improving our understanding of forest-road effects on substrate in headwater streams of the Southwest Crown of the Continent

In 2010, Congress established ten decade-long Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program projects to carry out fuel reduction and ecological restoration treatments on public lands across the country. The Southwest Crown of the Continent was selected as one of the locations under this initiative, given the importance of this region to the economic vitality of local communities and the...

Yellowstone stream temperature sampling.
Date Published: April 12, 2016
Status: Active

Developing stream temperature networks for the Greater Yellowstone to aid in managing aquatic resources under a changing climate

The topographic diversity and extensive area of protected public land within the Greater Yellowstone demonstrate the importance of this region as a natural resource reserve. Understanding the effects of anticipated changes in climate on aquatic resources and means for managing these resources will ultimately require accurate linkages between empirical data and regional climatic patterns. This...

Children examine the Loosing a Legacy exhibit at the MOST museum in Syracuse NY.
Date Published: April 11, 2016
Status: Active

Repeat Photography Teacher Trunk

This trunk was made possible from a grant from NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement Mission. It is designed to get students thinking about measuring precipitation - snow and ice, as well as rain- not just to do it, but why we would want to do it.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Piegan Glacier 2009.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Vegetation - Sperry Glacier

This view of the northeast portion of Sperry Glacier shows evidence of the glacier's recession as well as the advancement of conifer species and other vegetation on the glacial moraines.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Piegan Glacier 2009.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Vegetation - Piegan Glacier

These photographs document another aspect of Glacier Park’s dynamic environment, vegetation change. Although Piegan Glacier has not melted noticeably, years of fire suppression and changing climate may have allowed the invasion of conifers in what was an open meadow in the foreground of the 1930 photo. Also, the demise of the ecologically important whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis ) is...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Hidden Lake (b) 2009.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Vegetation - Hidden Lake (b)

Alpine regions along the shores of Hidden Lake (1943 m) show tremendous expansion of vegetation in this photo comparison, especially at the base of Bearhat Mountain.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Logan Pass 2009.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Vegetation - Logan Pass

Establishment of new growth and expansion of existing sparse vegetation is obvious along the upper ridge line (center of photo). Persistent snowpack in these alpine regions once deterred profusion of growth, but changing climate conditions have permitted these species to expand their range.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Thunderbird Glacier 2007.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Thunderbird Glacier

Thunderbird Glacier, Glacier National Park.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Hidden Lake (a) 2009.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Vegetation - Hidden Lake (a)

Vegetation ingrowth on the penninsula and surrounding lakeshore are evident in this pair of photos.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Filter Total Items: 252
People sitting and standing listening to scientists talking.
June 27, 2016

Pre-Sample Briefing

Pre-deployment briefing for the Upper Missouri River Pallid Sturgeon Drift Study. Fish biologists and physical scientists from Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks, US Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, University of Montana, Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, and US Army Corps of Engineers go over the sample design and assignments.

A person's hands with gloves on looking at a drift sampe
June 27, 2016

Processing a Drift Sample

Student Contractor Garrett Cook processes a drift sample collected on June 27 shortly after the free embryos and beads were released. Note the small cluster of pallid sturgeon free embryos and green beads in the lower portion of the sorting tray. These embryos and beads were elements of the Upper Missouri River drift experiment.

People distributing free embryos to boats
June 27, 2016

Distribution of Free Embryos to Boats

Distribution of free embryos to boats in preparation for mass release.

People on boats releasing larva into the water.
June 27, 2016

Larval Release

Simultaneous mass release of 700,000 free embryos from boats distributed across the channel of the Upper Missouri River.

Photo of a red dye-tracer study in June 2016 on the Missouri River near Fort Peck Dam, Montana.
June 26, 2016

Red dye-tracer study in June 2016 on the Missouri River in Montana

USGS scientists conducted a dye-tracer study in June 2016 on the Missouri River about 10 miles downstream of Fort Peck Dam, Montana. The public can expect to see the Yellowstone River turn a similar color in the vicinity of the injection site when scientists conduct a dye study near Glendive, Montana in late June, 2017.

Red dye viewable in a river
June 26, 2016

Dye Delivery

The rhodamine-WT dye was injected in the river uniformly across the channel.

Scientists on a boat preparing a dye study
June 26, 2016

Dye Preparation

USGS scientists prepare to mix rhodamine-WT dye for the dye trace experiment.  The suits are to keep the harmless dye off of clothing.

Fish swim along the gravel bed bottom of the North Fork of the Flathead River.
June 24, 2016

Fish Swimming on Gravel Bed

Fish swim along the gravel bed bottom of the North Fork of the Flathead River.

 Blackfeet Environmental Office personnel groundwater sampling
June 1, 2016

Blackfeet Environmental Office personnel groundwater sampling

USGS hydrologist trains Blackfeet Enviromental Office staff to collect groundwater samples on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation

Montana wetland
May 16, 2016

Montana wetland

Panoramic view of a Montana wetland

Mother grizzly and cub at Gibbon River, Yellowstone National Park.
May 6, 2016

Mother grizzly and cub at Gibbon River, Yellowstone National Park

A USGS grizzly bear researcher snapped this picture of a mother grizzly bear and her cub in Yellowstone National Park. Adult females are the most important segment of the grizzly bear populations because they are the reproductive engine.

Filter Total Items: 124
USGS
July 9, 2007

A report published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contains a regional map and associated database that inventory 61 locations of reported natural asbestos and fibrous amphibole occurrences in the Rocky Mountain area of the United States, including the states of Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, and Wyoming.

USGS
May 9, 2007

People who felt the magnitude 4.6 earthquake that hit Western Montana on May 8 can report their experiences during the temblor at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Web site, "Did You Feel It?" at http://pasadena.wr.usgs.gov/shake/STORE/X2007ccay/ciim_display.html, or go to the USGS Web site http://earthquake.usgs.gov, and click on "Did You Feel It?" 

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 8, 2006

A report published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contains a regional map and an associated database that inventory 36 locations of reported natural asbestos and fibrous amphibole occurrences in the central United States.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 4, 2006

One of every four fishes in streams of 12 western states is non-native, according to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study published in November 2005 in the North American Journal of Fisheries Management. 

USGS
May 4, 2006

One of every four fishes in streams of 12 western states is non-native, according to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study published in November 2005 in the North American Journal of Fisheries Management. And, researchers found, it´s not just that there are a lot of non-native fishes but they are also widespread...

USGS
March 22, 2006

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists with the Global Change Research Project are unveiling a new website featuring a collection of repeat photographs of glaciers in and around Glacier National Park, Montana. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 22, 2006

 

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists with the Global Change Research Project are unveiling a new website featuring a collection of repeat photographs of glaciers in and around Glacier National Park, Montana.

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 31, 2005

Most species of migratory birds in the Northern Hemisphere make two long trips each year, one north for nesting and the other south for the winter. New information collected by USGS scientists shows that individuals of at least one species, the prairie falcon, make three separate long trips each year.

USGS
June 28, 2005

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) announces the recipients of the second year of the Mineral Resources External Research Program, a grant and/or cooperative agreement opportunity designed to support minerals research. The grant award is split among six topics that support the goals of the Mineral Resources Program and deliver products within one year.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 1, 2004

A new map from the U.S. Geological Survey and the Central United States Earthquake Consortium shows that Central States, including Arkansas, Tennessee, Missouri, Kentucky and Indiana are among the most seismically active states east of the Rocky Mountains. More than 800 earthquakes are cataloged on the map that depicts the locations of earthquakes large enough to be felt, since 1699.

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Scientists from the Center work in the northern Rocky Mountains and across the U.S. Many work throughout the world on issues as diverse as global climate change, aquatic ecology, wildlife diseases, bison ecology, and large carnivores.

Go to NOROCK

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's hydrologists, engineers, geospatial analysts, hydrologic technicians, geologists, and support staff work to provide hydrologic data and interpretive studies.

Go to Center