Unified Interior Regions

Nevada

The Southwest Region includes California, Nevada, and Arizona. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 144
USGS
June 1, 1999

The slow growth rates of calcite and opal minerals that coat fractures and cavities in Yucca Mountain attest to the hydrological stability of that Nevada mountain for the past several million years, according to three U.S. Geological Survey scientists. They presented their views today (June 2) at the spring meeting of American Geophysical Union in Boston.

USGS
February 22, 1999

A forum that brings together researchers and managers to examine the status of scientific knowledge about the Mojave Desert will be hosted by the U.S. Geological Survey at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Feb. 25-27.

USGS
June 30, 1998

The fabled waters of Lake Tahoe may soon become clearer as U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists make plans to map the mysterious floor of the lake, using the ocean exploration technology known as "multi- beam bathymetry." 

USGS
June 22, 1998

Gasoline-related compounds were found in water samples from Lake Tahoe by U.S. Geological Survey scientists during the July through September 1997 boating season. MTBE (methyl tert -butyl ether), a gasoline additive, was found in non-toxic concentrations throughout the lake, as deep as 90 feet. 

USGS
June 12, 1998

Minuscule fossil animal teeth, known as conodonts, indicate that a 370-million-year-old comet that slammed into southern Nevada could be as much as five times larger than scientists initially suspected.

USGS
June 5, 1998

The Lake Tahoe Data Clearinghouse, a virtual, web-based project, providing everything from digital maps of the lake and surrounding basin to notes from recent presidential forum meetings, is now on line at http://blt.wr.usgs.gov/

USGS
March 20, 1998

Minuscule fossil animal teeth, known as conodonts, indicate that a 370-million-year-old comet that slammed into Nevada could be as much as five times larger than scientists initially suspected.

USGS
October 29, 1997

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) today joined forces with other federal and state agencies to announce specific efforts to implement recommendations of this summer’s Lake Tahoe Presidential Forum, including creation of an Internet-based clearinghouse of scientific information for the Lake Tahoe area.

USGS
October 20, 1997

An extraterrestrial object, theorized to be a comet at least one kilometer in diameter, impacted what is now southern Nevada about 370 million years ago.

USGS
October 17, 1997

What the rover really saw on Mars, the effects of an asteroid impact in southern Nevada 370 million years ago, and how climate change will affect society and the environment are a sample of the earth-science topics that will be presented by scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey during a national science meeting in Salt Lake City next week.

USGS
January 3, 1997

The floods have crested and are beginning to recede in most places in the Pacific Northwest. Nevertheless dozens of U.S. Geological Survey personnel, who were busy over the holidays measuring the high streamflows and keeping river stage monitors operating, are still busy in the field and in their offices. Field crews have been hampered by mudslides, road closures, and extremely dangerous condition

USGS
March 15, 1996

Dr. Philip N. Slater, a remote sensing scientist at the University of Arizona, received the 1995 William T. Pecora Award during ceremonies held on February 27, 1996, at the Eleventh Thematic Conference on Applied Geologic Remote Sensing, in Las Vegas, Nev.