Unified Interior Regions

New Hampshire

New Hampshire is in the temperate broadleaf and mixed forests biome and is the state with the highest percentage of timberland area in the country. Much of the state, in particular the White Mountains, is covered by the conifers and northern hardwoods of the New England-Acadian forests. New Hampshire also has the shortest ocean coastline of any state in the United States, approximately18 miles.

New England Water Science Center - New Hampshire/Vermont

New England Water Science Center - New Hampshire/Vermont

361 Commerce Way
Pembroke, NH 03275-3718

Phone: (603) 226-7800
Fax: (603) 226-7894

New England Water

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 74
USGS
March 8, 2010

The March 14-15 storm that brought rains of 7 inches or more in southeastern New Hampshire caused stream flooding throughout the Seacoast and southern regions of the state, according to preliminary estimates released today by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). 

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 16, 2009

Levels of chloride, a component of salt, are elevated in many urban streams and groundwater across the northern U.S., according to a new government study. Chloride levels above the recommended federal criteria set to protect aquatic life were found in more than 40 percent of urban streams tested. The study was released today by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 9, 2009

Increased demand for water and a warmer climate will likely decrease the amount of water available in the streams and aquifers of southeast New Hampshire's Seacoast region. Summer stream flows could be 10 percent less by 2025 than they are now and groundwater levels will likely drop if demand continues to grow as projected.

USGS
December 18, 2008

U.S. Geological Survey Deputy Director Robert Doyle has been selected as a Distinguished recipient of the Presidential Rank Award, a prestigious award that commends outstanding leadership and long-term accomplishments.

USGS
May 9, 2008

By 2025, demand for water in the Seacoast Region of New Hampshire is expected to grow by more than 50 percent. In the past five years, water use was estimated at 26.3 million gallons per day. By 2025, the demand may be more than 40 million gallons per day. These findings were released today by the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS
January 2, 2008

The gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is widespread in New Hampshire's ground water, particularly in four counties -- Rockingham, Strafford, Hillsborough and Merrimack. Ground water from these counties was more likely to contain MTBE than were samples from the rest of the state. 

USGS
April 25, 2007

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) today issued preliminary estimates of the magnitudes of floods experienced throughout New Hampshire from April 16 through April 18. The highest ever flows recorded by the USGS occurred at 5 rivers in southern New Hampshire.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 25, 2006

Many private ground-water wells in New Hampshire and Maine may have arsenic at concentrations close to or above Federal safety standards for public water supplies. A recently released study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) shows the likely locations of elevated arsenic.

USGS
May 25, 2006

Many private ground-water wells in New Hampshire and Maine may have arsenic at concentrations close to or above Federal safety standards for public water supplies. A recently released study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) shows the likely locations of elevated arsenic.

USGS
May 22, 2006

Note to Editors: Return intervals are used by hydrologists to describe the magnitude and frequency of floods and represent the average interval of time over which floods of similar magnitudes are expected to occur. Digital images of these photographs are available on the Web site http://nh.water.usgs.gov

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 22, 2006

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) today issued preliminary estimates of the magnitudes of floods experienced throughout New Hampshire from May 13 through May 17. The highest ever flows recorded by the USGS occurred at 12 rivers in central and southern New Hampshire.

USGS science for a changing world logo
November 7, 2005

As the spectacular New England fall foliage gives way to another of the region's infamous winters, many wonder what this year will bring. Long-time residents think winter just isn't what it used to be in New England.

New England Water Science Center - New Hampshire/Vermont

New England Water Science Center - New Hampshire/Vermont

361 Commerce Way
Pembroke, NH 03275-3718

Phone: (603) 226-7800
Fax: (603) 226-7894

New England Water