Unified Interior Regions

North Carolina

We conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens and landscapes of the Southeastern United States and the Caribbean region.

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Filter Total Items: 87
Date published: October 19, 2016

Effects of Land-Applied Biosolids on Water Quality in the Jordan Lake Watershed, North Carolina

Land application of municipal wastewater biosolids is the most common method of biosolids management used in North Carolina and the United States. Biosolids have characteristics that may be beneficial to soil and plants. Land application can take advantage of these beneficial qualities, whereas disposal in landfills or incineration poses no beneficial use of the waste.

However, recent...

Contacts: Chad R Wagner
Date published: October 17, 2016
Status: Active

Brunswick County, NC Groundwater-Level Monitoring

Since 2000, the population of Brunswick County has grown by more than 50%. A growth of this magnitude places significant stress on Brunswick County’s natural resources. County planners have recognized the potential consequences of land use changes associated with growth and the resulting increased demand on water resources by consolidating the many public utility providers into one...

Date published: October 3, 2016
Status: Active

Application of Phreatophytes to Remediate Contaminated Groundwater Before Discharge to Protected Surface-Water Systems

State environmental agencies are charged with the protection of groundwater and surface-water systems from water-quality degradation. Although the point-source discharge of wastes to surface waters is allowed up to permitted levels, contaminant releases from non-point sources, such as the discharge of contaminated groundwater, is not regulated. A common cause of groundwater contamination is...

Contacts: James Landmeyer
Date published: August 4, 2016
Status: Active

Directions to South Atlantic Water Science Center offices

The South Atlantic Water Science Centers has science and field offices in Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina.

Date published: July 27, 2016
Status: Archived

Continuous Water-Quality Monitoring at Lake Mattamuskeet, North Carolina

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has partnered with the U.S. Geological Survey to establish two automated water quality monitoring stations and one precipitation monitoring station at Lake Mattamuskeet. Lake Mattamuskeet comprises 41,084 acres of the 50,180 acre Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) and is divided by a causeway. The causeway effectively splits the lake into two...

Contacts: Sean D Egen
Date published: July 26, 2016
Status: Active

HDgov: Multi-agency Website for Human Dimensions of Natural Resources

HDgov is an interactive and mobile-responsive online portal to interagency, academic, and non-government resources focused on the human dimensions of natural resource management. The web portal provides easy access to tools, publications, data, and methods that help ensure that the people side of natural resources is considered throughout the entire natural resource management process. The...

Date published: July 26, 2016
Status: Active

National Park Service Visitor Spending Effects

The National Park Service (NPS) manages the Nation’s most iconic destinations that attract millions of visitors from across the Nation and around the world. Trip-related spending by NPS visitors generates and supports a considerable amount of economic activity within park gateway communities. USGS economists collaborate with the National Park Service social science program to estimate NPS...

Date published: July 21, 2016
Status: Active

North American Waterfowl Management Plan

The ultimate success of North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP) depends on maintaining relevance to stakeholders and society. In order to be relevant, a first step is to better understand what people value in regard to waterfowl and their habitats. 

Date published: June 1, 2016
Status: Completed

Storm Impact Assessments on Coastal Bird Populations, Behavior, and Nesting along the Outer Banks Barrier Islands, North Carolina

Using historic maps and contemporary imagery, we will quantify and synthesize existing data on the distribution and abundance of shorebirds in North Carolina and changes in habitats related to storms, such as Hurricane Sandy; coastal development, such as the Intracoastal Waterway; inlet modifications; and shoreline erosion to give us a better understanding of historic trends for shorebirds and...

Contacts: Kathryn Spear
Date published: April 13, 2016

Understanding Coastal Change

Scientists perform a range of studies that document, assess, and model coastal change, risk, and vulnerability. Studies include historical shoreline change, the geologic structure and history of coastal regions, sediment supply and transport, sea-level rise, and how extreme storm events affect rates and impacts of coastal change.

Date published: April 13, 2016

Geologic Hazards and Catastrophic Events

We study the distribution and hazard potential of coastal and submarine events such as earthquakes and submarine landslides and associated tsunami potential, hurricane induced coastal inundation, extreme storms, sea-level rise and oil and gas spills. We also model development to help evaluate and forecast coastal hazard probability and occurrence.

Date published: April 13, 2016

Ocean Resources for America's Needs

Our scientists conduct research studies focused on geologic mapping, sampling and understanding of mineral and energy resources and studies of the geologic setting and processes to inform renewable energy development offshore.

Filter Total Items: 87

Flooding on the French Broad River

North Carolina saw heavy rainfall in the second half of May 2018 as a result of Subtropical Storm Alberto. These images from the European Space Agency's Sentinel-2B satellite, captured on May 12 and June 1, 2018, highlight flooding along the French Broad River near the Henderson County community of Etowah. 

Current view of the webcam

Briar Creek near Charlotte (0214642825)

This camera is a part of the Flood Information and Notification System (FINS) network in Charlotte and Mecklenburg County, NC. The FINS network consists of 54 streamgages and 72 raingages. Most sites in the network are equipped with radio telemetry which log and transmit data in 5-minute intervals. Some sites outside of the City of Charlotte boundary are equipped with

...
Current view of the webcam

Briar Creek at Providence Road (02146449)

This camera is a part of the Flood Information and Notification System (FINS) network in Charlotte and Mecklenburg County, NC. The FINS network consists of 54 streamgages and 72 raingages. Most sites in the network are equipped with radio telemetry which log and transmit data in 5-minute intervals. Some sites outside of the City of Charlotte boundary are equipped with

...
Current view of the webcam

Little Hope Creek at Seneca Place (02146470)

This camera is a part of the Flood Information and Notification System (FINS) network in Charlotte and Mecklenburg County, NC. The FINS network consists of 54 streamgages and 72 raingages. Most sites in the network are equipped with radio telemetry which log and transmit data in 5-minute intervals. Some sites outside of the City of Charlotte boundary are equipped with

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Filter Total Items: 110
USGS
December 18, 2008

U.S. Geological Survey Deputy Director Robert Doyle has been selected as a Distinguished recipient of the Presidential Rank Award, a prestigious award that commends outstanding leadership and long-term accomplishments.

USGS
October 15, 2008

Education activity for local students to learn from water experts about the water resources in the Triangle area. Activities will include hands-on experiments.  Students will see, touch, and try on specialized gear used during water testing; and play interactive games to build and test their water knowledge.

USGS
October 9, 2008

Education activity for local students to learn from water experts about the water resources in the Triangle area. Activities will include hands-on experiments.  Students will see, touch, and try on specialized gear used during water testing; and play interactive games to build and test their water knowledge

USGS
August 29, 2008

The remnants of what was Tropical Storm Fay brought a deluge of water to parts of North Carolina that were parched by a record-breaking drought. Yet scientists watching the rapidly changing water situation find themselves cautioning residents that this drought is far from over.

USGS
August 11, 2008

Streamflow in the French Broad River at Asheville has reached the lowest level since 1895 when the U.S. Geological Survey first began making measurements at the site. On Sunday, the streamflow was about 121 million gallons per day (Mgd), or 188 cubic feet per second.  

USGS
August 31, 2007

August was a hot, dry month in North Carolina bringing record lows to many of the state's rivers and streams and worsening the drought conditions.

USGS
June 8, 2007

Despite some rainfall at the end of the month, streamflows during May in North Carolina were at or near record low levels, particularly in the western part of the state.

USGS
December 20, 2006

Many chemicals were detected in ground water from selected areas of the Piedmont Aquifer System (PAS), but concentrations of those chemicals were below drinking-water standards in most cases, according to a report released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 20, 2006

Many chemicals were detected in ground water from selected areas of the Piedmont Aquifer System (PAS), but concentrations of those chemicals were below drinking-water standards in most cases, according to a report released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). For example, none of the 47 pesticides or 59 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) analyzed exceeded drinking-water standards.

USGS
April 7, 2006

Despite recent rain, water levels in streams throughout the Mid-Atlantic and surrounding regions remain near record lows for this time of year, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 16, 2004

The U.S. Geological Survey alerted state and federal agencies today to the increased potential for landslides in the mountainous regions of Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio and Maryland due to anticipated heavy rainfall from Hurricane Ivan.