Unified Interior Regions

South Carolina

We conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens and landscapes of the Southeastern United States and the Caribbean region.

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USGS science for a changing world logo
September 9, 2004

Streamgages continue to measure new daily record high flows on waterways along the U.S. eastern seaboard as yet another hurricane promises to deliver more rain to parts of the already soggy region. Although flooding in the immediate Richmond area receded quickly earlier this week, the city may receive additional heavy rainfall from Frances in coming days. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 3, 2004

 

Because of an increasing awareness of the critical role of ground water in sustaining coastal populations, economies, and ecosystems, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has recently published a report that describes ground water conditions in freshwater and saltwater environments along the Atlantic coast. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
November 13, 2002

Hurricanes brush or hit Charleston, S.C., about once every five and a half years, often generating large storm surges on top of already impressive tides. A hurricane that hit Charleston in 1752 caused a storm surge that nearly covered the entire present downtown area, according to one source. When the wind shifted, the water level fell 5 feet in 10 minutes.

USGS
November 13, 2002

Hurricanes brush or hit Charleston, S.C., about once every five and a half years, often generating large storm surges on top of already impressive tides. A hurricane that hit Charleston in 1752 caused a storm surge that nearly covered the entire present downtown area, according to one source. When the wind shifted, the water level fell 5 feet in 10 minutes.

USGS
December 5, 2000

A deadly bird disease, avian vacuolar myelinopathy (AVM), is affecting mallard ducks and coots on Woodlake in North Carolina; coots on Lake Juliette in central Georgia; and coots, bald eagles and -- for the first time -- a Canada goose on Strom Thurmond Lake on the border of South Carolina and Georgia.

USGS
September 23, 1999

While much of eastern North Carolina remains under water, U.S. Geological Survey scientists and hydrologic technicians are boating over rooftops, submerged cars, and bridges and roads topped by deep water to collect data and determine the amount of environmental damage done by Hurricane Floyd’s heavy rains.

USGS
September 10, 1999

While Hurricane Dennis is little more than a soggy memory, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are hard at work trying to understand how the storm changed the landscape of beaches along the Virginia and Carolina coasts.

USGS
August 27, 1999

USGS scientists, managers and experts from a diverse spectrum of scientific disciplines are on high alert Friday as Hurricane Dennis seems poised to make landfall along the southeastern coast of the United States sometime this weekend.

USGS
March 29, 1999

The mysterious brain disease responsible for the deaths of bald eagles and American coots in Arkansas has now been found in two species of ducks discovered dead at Woodlake, North Carolina, and in bald eagles and coots from three other southeastern states.

USGS
April 13, 1998

A minor earthquake, preliminary magnitude 3.9 according to the U.S. Geological Survey, occurred in South Carolina at 5:56 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time on April 13. The epicenter was about 25 miles (40 km) north-northeast of Camden, S.C.

USGS
September 5, 1996

From coastal erosion to measuring the storm surge and flooding as well as providing maps of affected areas, the U.S. Geological Survey is gearing up to provide information on Hurricane Fran as the storm develops, including real-time data, from its offices in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York.