Unified Interior Regions

Texas

The Southwest Region ranges from the Colorado Rockies to the Gulf Coast and the Western Deserts to the Great Plains. The Southwest Region conducts multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring in locations across the Region, the United States, around the world, and across our solar system.

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A rainbow arc over a large-volume public-supply well
March 10, 2016

Rainbow and public-supply well

A large-volume public supply well in San Antonio, Texas.  This well is being sampled for water-quality constituents as part of the NAWQA Enhanced Trend Network project.

USGS scientist collects a groundwater-level measurement in Freeport, Texas. 
January 31, 2016

Collecting a groundwater-level measurement in Freeport, Texas

USGS hydrologist Jason Ramage collects a groundwater-level measurement using a steel tape in Freeport, Texas. 

A new interactive web application illustrates how groundwater, sediment compaction and land-elevation change are related in the Houston-Galveston region in Texas. 

Image shows a scanning electron microscope image of finchite
December 31, 2015

Scanning Electron Microscope Image of Finchite

A scanning electron microscope image of the newly discovered mineral finchite. The Denver Microbeam Lab provided this scan of finchite in order to help describe and identify the mineral as a new one. Finchite is a uranium mineral first observed in Martin County, Texas. Read more about our uranium research here

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Image shows a sample of the mineral finchite with a chair wheel for scale
December 31, 2015

Finchite Mineral

A sample of finchite, a newly discovered uranium mineral. Finchite is the yellow material on the surface of the rock. Finchite is found in the late Pleistocene sediments deposited during the Illinoian glacial stage. It was first observed in Martin County, Texas. Read more about our uranium research here

Image shows a sample of finchite with a quarter for scale
December 31, 2015

Finchite Mineral

A sample of finchite, a newly discovered uranium mineral. Finchite is the yellow material on the surface of the rock. Finchite is found in the late Pleistocene sediments deposited during the Illinoian glacial stage. It was first observed in Martin County, Texas. Read more about our uranium research here

Image shows a man examine rock layers
December 31, 2015

USGS Scientist Examining Texas Rock Layers for Finchite Minerals

USGS scientist Bradley Van Gosen examines rock layers for the newly discovered mineral finchite near Lamesa, Texas. Van Gosen was the first to recognize the existence of the new mineral, which was named for long-time USGS uranium geologist Warren Finch. Read more about our uranium research here

Image shows a dry creek bed with two men standing on the banks
December 31, 2015

USGS Scientists Seeking Finchite by the Sulfur Springs Draw in Texas

Between Lamesa and Big Spring, Texas, runs the Sulfur Spring Draw, a dry creek. It's the site of an economic calcrete-type uranium deposit, the Sulfur Springs Draw Deposit, where a new mineral was discovered in 2015. The mineral, first observed by USGS scientist Bradley Van Gosen, is a uranium-mineral named finchite after long-time USGS uranium geologist Warren Finch. Read

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Image shows a rock outcropping surrounded by desert vegation
December 31, 2015

Calcrete near Sulfur Springs Draw

A calcrete outcropping near Sulfur Springs Draw in Texas. This deposit dates to the Pliocene and Pleistocene, and hosts uranium-vanadate minerals.

Image shows a landscape of the Southern High Plains
December 31, 2015

The Southern High Plains

The Southern High Plains of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. USGS conducted a uranium assessment in this region in 2015.

Image shows a detail of a yellow mineral on white rock
December 31, 2015

Uranium-Vanadate Mineral in Calcrete

A uranium-vanadate mineral in calcrete. This sample came from near the Sulfur Springs Draw in Texas. USGS conducted an assessment of uranium resources in this region in 2015.

A USGS hydrotech stands below the sampling point of a high-volume public-supply well
December 2, 2015

Sampling point for a large-volume public-supply well

A large-volume public supply well in San Antonio, Texas.  This well is being sampled for water-quality constituents as part of the NAWQA Enhanced Trend Network project.

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USGS science for a changing world logo
March 28, 2011

New scientific research concludes that large earthquakes do not increase the global seismic hazard for more damaging earthquakes far from the mainshock. 

USGS
December 17, 2010

All water quality samples collected from 28 wells near Houston, TX did not contain uranium and radioactive elements above the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) for treated drinking water, a new study shows.

USGS
October 29, 2010

In this USGS media tipsheet, we've gone through thousands of GSA conference abstracts and selected some of the newest, most exciting USGS science presentations for your convenience. We hope you find it useful.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 13, 2009

Five giant non-native snake species would pose high risks to the health of ecosystems in the United States should they become established here, according to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report released today.
The USGS report details the risks of nine non-native boa, anaconda and python species that are invasive or potentially invasive in the United States.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 21, 2009

Idaho Developed Mapping Method Garners Prestigious Award. Data from earth observing Landsat satellites plays a central role in a new, award-winning type of mapping that tracks water use. Water-use maps help save taxpayer money by increasing the accuracy and effectiveness of public decisions involving water – for instance, in monitoring compliance with legal water rights. The maps are especially

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 14, 2009

Intersex in smallmouth and largemouth basses is widespread in numerous river basins throughout the United States is the major finding of the most comprehensive and large-scale evaluation of the condition, according to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research published online in Aquatic Toxicology.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 16, 2009

Water produced by the High Plains aquifer, which provides water to eight states, is generally acceptable for human consumption, irrigation, and livestock watering, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study highlighted at the summer meeting of the Western States Water Council in Park City, Utah.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 16, 2009

Spring nutrient delivery to the northern Gulf of Mexico is among the highest measured by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in thirty years. Too many nutrients, which are essential for plant growth, are not necessarily a good thing.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 8, 2009

USGS Shares Findings and Lessons from Ike at the 2009 National Hurricane Conference in Austin
The 2008 hurricane season made its mark on the northern Gulf of Mexico coastline by leaving it more vulnerable to future storms.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 18, 2009

On Nov. 1, 1933, Mrs. Bruce Reid recorded seeing both a male and female ivory-billed woodpecker in Texas. And on May 28, 1938, Oscar McKinley Bryans observed a ruby-throated hummingbird in Michigan, noting that the birds were most common when apple trees were blooming. These are just two of more than 6 million personal observations scribbled and preserved on notecards in government files.