Unified Interior Regions

Wyoming

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 87
Wyoming landscape in spring.
Date Published: April 1, 2016

Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI)

The WLCI is a long-term science based effort to enhance aquatic and terrestrial habitats at a landscape scale in Southwest Wyoming, while facilitating responsible development.

Lamar Valley, Yellowstone National Park.
Date Published: March 18, 2016

Developing a mechanistic understanding between recent climate patterns and Aquatic Vital Signs in the Greater Yellowstone Network

The National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring program was established to provide park managers with a broad understanding of the status of park resources using the best available science. This program acknowledges that NPS managers are confronted with complex challenges associated with the management of dynamic landscapes responding to multiple, interacting drivers of change. To provide...

Contacts: Adam Sepulveda
Sampling for aquatic invasive species in the Greater Yellowstone Area.
Date Published: March 18, 2016
Status: Active

An investigation of aquatic invasive species in pristine sites in the Greater Yellowstone Area

Aquatic invasive species (AIS) are aquatic organisms that move into ecosystems beyond their natural, historic range and cause severe and irreversible damage to the habitats they invade. Most AIS arrive as a direct result of human activity, such as boating and angling. The threat of AIS introduction is especially high in the Greater Yellowstone Area, as humans from all over the world come to...

Contacts: Adam Sepulveda
Mount Rainier seen from Puyallup, Washington
Date Published: March 17, 2016

Volcano Hazards Assessments Help Mitigate Disasters

The Volcano Hazards Program develops long-range volcano hazards assessments. These includes a summary of the specific hazards, their impact areas, and a map showing ground-hazard zones. The assessments are also critical for planning long-term land-use and effective emergency-response measures, especially when a volcano begins to show signs of unrest.

Boreal toad on a burned log.
Date Published: March 15, 2016

RARMI: Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK) Apex Sites

In contrast to RARMI study areas in Colorado that have 10 or more years of records of continuous population monitoring, there are fewer long-term datasets for amphibian populations in the northern Rocky Mountains. The exception is an ongoing study of Columbia spotted frogs at Lodge Creek, Yellowstone National Park. Three other long-term research and monitoring areas have been established in...

Contacts: Blake Hossack
Red spotted toad.
Date Published: March 15, 2016

RARMI: Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) Apex Sites

FORT is monitoring populations of amphibians at three apex sites using capture-recapture methods. Our goal in monitoring populations is to detect fluctuations in population size, sex ratio, survival, and recruitment. Through long-term monitoring, we can also address breeding phenology in relation to elevation, weather, and climate. Other specific questions can be asked about issues such as...

A wolf at the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in Montana as shown in thermal imagery.
Date Published: March 15, 2016
Status: Completed

COMPLETED: Using thermal imagery to assess wolf hairloss from sarcoptic mange

Researchers at NOROCK and their partners used thermal cameras at the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in Montana to assess the amount of heat lost under a range of environmental conditions with and without hair. These methods help scientists better understand how mange operates in wild wolves throughout the Greater...

Contacts: Paul Cross, Emily Almberg, Doug Smith, Adam Munn, Peter Hudson, John Heine, Dan Stahler, Shane Maloney
Near-surface “mantis” sensors and a webcam, which is part of the National PhenoCam Network, to monitor sagebrush steppe.
Date Published: March 15, 2016

Impacts of climate change on habitat quality: plant phenology interactions with animal use and fitness

Weather and climate impact terrestrial wildlife habitat through their influences on plant productivity. Plant phenology – the timing of life-history events such as green-up, flowering and senescence – provides one indicator of the timing and magnitude of productivity. Changes and variability in plant phenology in space and time are indicators of habitat quality, which is a driver of fitness...

Contacts: Geneva W Chong
Red Eagle Fire, Montana.
Date Published: March 15, 2016

Identification of Fire Refugia in Rocky Mountain Ecosystems of the U.S. and Canada: Development and Application of the Refugium Concept for Biodiversity Conservation over Large Spatial and Temporal Scales

We described the climate space of fire regimes in northwestern North America (Whitman and others 2015), and we are refining an approach to identify fire refugia – areas that do not burn or burn with lower severity through multiple fire events. We continue our collaboration to test the function of refugia for biodiversity conservation under current and future climate and fire scenarios. We...

Contacts: Geneva W Chong
Image: Greater Sage Grouse
Date Published: March 10, 2016

Geneva Chong's Past Projects

These are Geneva Chong's past projects.

Contacts: Geneva W Chong
USGS
Date Published: March 2, 2016

Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO)

Monitors and studies the active geologic processes and hazards of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field and its caldera. Yellowstone National Park contains the largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features in the world. YVO also monitors volcanic activity in Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico.

Image: USGS Scientist Conducting Amphibian Research
Date Published: May 15, 2015
Status: Completed

Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative: Rocky Mountain Region

Decline of amphibian populations worldwide has prompted an international effort to determine causes of decline in various locations and ecosytems. Some causes which have been suggested include habitat alteration, introduced species, disease, and environmental stressors such as ultraviolet radiation, agricultural chemicals in groundwater, and contaminants in atmospheric deposition. The ...

Filter Total Items: 292
Measuring streamflow in Goose Creek, near Acme
December 27, 2017

Measuring streamflow in Goose Creek, near Acme, station 06305700

Measuring streamflow in Goose Creek, near Acme, station 06305700

Measuring streamflow in Pass Creek, near Parkman, WY, station 06289600
December 27, 2017

Measuring streamflow under ice, Pass Creek, nr Parkman, WY

Measuring streamflow under ice, Pass Creek, near Parkman, WY, station 06289600

Cheyenne Wyoming office
December 19, 2017

Cheyenne Wyoming office

Cheyenne Wyoming office

Outside stream stage of Bull Lake Creek abv Bull Lake
December 13, 2017

Reading stream stage at Bull Lake Creek above Bull Lake streamgage

The wire weight is lowered to determine stage of Bull Lake Creek above Bull Lake

Wire weight mounted on bridge crossing Blacks Fork, streamgage 09219200
November 29, 2017

Wire weight mounted on bridge crossing Blacks Fork, streamgage 0921920

Wire weight mounted on bridge crossing Blacks Fork, streamgage 09219200

Setting up to measure streamflow, Muddy Creek near Dad
October 17, 2017

Setting up to measure streamflow, Muddy Creek near Dad

Setting up to measure streamflow, Muddy Creek near Dad

Installing new radar sensor and staff plate, Big Sandy River
October 6, 2017

Installing new radar sensor and staff plate, Big Sandy River

Installing new radar sensor and staff plate, Big Sandy River

Scientist explains trench work to media
September 20, 2017

Teton Fault

Chris explains the Teton trench work with local media members and Jackson Hole Mountain Resort engineer Bill Schreiber. 

Trench site and fault scarp
September 19, 2017

Teton Fault

Photo taken from the UAV (drone) of the trench site and continuation of the fault scarp (steep slope above the mowed grass) with Teton Village in the background.

Scientists collect and OSL sample
September 18, 2017

Teton Fault

Rich, Nicole, and Seth keep the tarps in places while Chris (he's the one you can't see under the tarp) collects an OSL sample in darkness.

Scientists take charcoal sample
September 17, 2017

Teton Fault

Chris and Ralph take a sample of charcoal for radiocarbon dating. 

Scientists take a sample for OSL dating from trench wall
September 17, 2017

Teton Fault

Mark and Rich collect a sample for optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating by pounding a metal tube into the trench wall.

Filter Total Items: 111
USGS
March 29, 2010

Brucellosis, a bacterial infection of cattle, elk and bison, appears to be increasing in several elk populations in northwestern Wyoming, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study recently released in the publication Ecological Applications.

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 7, 2009

The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), an agency of the Department of the Interior, has allocated $7 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds to 15 universities and state agencies nationwide.

USGS science for a changing world logo
November 4, 2009

Greater sage-grouse populations have declined substantially in many areas in the West, though populations in some locations remain relatively stable, according to a comprehensive publication written by federal, state, and non-governmental organizations. The population assessment is one of numerous sage-grouse topics covered in the 24 chapters released today.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 21, 2009

Idaho Developed Mapping Method Garners Prestigious Award. Data from earth observing Landsat satellites plays a central role in a new, award-winning type of mapping that tracks water use. Water-use maps help save taxpayer money by increasing the accuracy and effectiveness of public decisions involving water – for instance, in monitoring compliance with legal water rights. The maps are especially

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 28, 2009

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research hydrologist Dr. Yousif Kharaka will present a talk in Cheyenne, Wyo. about the feasibility and implications of capturing and storing the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide underground in depleted oil fields and deep rock formations with salty aquifers.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 16, 2009

Water produced by the High Plains aquifer, which provides water to eight states, is generally acceptable for human consumption, irrigation, and livestock watering, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study highlighted at the summer meeting of the Western States Water Council in Park City, Utah.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 15, 2009

Tracking Native Mussels on the Mississippi River
For the first time ever, mussels in the Mississippi River will be radio tagged and their movements observed during the water-level drawdown that is scheduled to begin next week.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 28, 2009

New U.S. Geological Survey research indicates that ammonia from water used in the production of natural gas from underground coal beds in Wyoming is entering the Powder River.
"High concentrations of ammonia are toxic, particularly at some of the higher pH values found in these discharged waters," said USGS scientist Richard Smith.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 2, 2009

Striking new glacier retreat photographs created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) visually illustrate the effects of climate change on Glacier National Park.
The glacier images reveal dramatic glacial decline over a century and are in line with predictions that all of the glaciers in Glacier National Park will disappear by 2030.

USGS
June 17, 2008

Long-term trends in landscape conditions have significantly reduced sagebrush habitat and populations of greater sage-grouse, according to a new study examining the bird's chances of survival.

USGS
May 30, 2008

New research suggests that how often Old Faithful and other Yellowstone geysers erupt may depend on annual rainfall patterns.

USGS
March 18, 2008

Competition for water is becoming more intense as the nation's population continues to grow, increasing the demands for water use in agriculture and power production.