Eastern Ecological Science Center

Filter Total Items: 321
Date published: April 14, 2021
Status: Active

Use of Structured Decision Making to Optimize Salt Marsh Management Decisions at Northeastern National Wildlife Refuges

US Fish and Wildlife Service completed a regional assessment of salt marsh integrity (SMI)  on 15 National Wildlife Refuges/Refuge Complexes in the northeastern US. Developed within a structured decision making (SDM) framework, the SMI assessment provides essential baseline data on salt marsh condition relative to regional management objectives. These data now provide the basis for applying...

Date published: March 30, 2021
Status: Active

Asian Flyways Collaborative for Waterbirds (AFCoW)

The Asian Flyways Collaborative for Waterbirds (AFCoW) is a collaborative group effort that brings together research scientists engaged in understanding waterbird ecology in Eastern Asia. Due to the complexity of waterbird biology and unique threats to their populations in East Asia, we propose to establish a voluntary international network of collaborators to promote advanced studies of large...

Contacts: John Takekawa, Andrea Contina, AFCoW Inbox
Date published: May 7, 2020
Status: Active

Enabling AI for citizen science in fish biology

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is revolutionizing ecology and conservation by enabling species recognition from photos and videos. Our project evaluates the capacity to expand AI for individual fish recognition for population assessment. The success of this effort would facilitate fisheries analysis at an unprecedented scale by engaging anglers and citizen scientists in imagery collection. This...

Date published: May 4, 2020
Status: Active

Hazard and Risk of Anticoagulant Rodenticides to Predatory and Scavenging Wildlife

Invasive mammalian predators are the most damaging group of animals affecting global biodiversity.  When introduced on remote islands, alien rodent species can devastate local biota and have been linked to approximately 30% of all extinctions. In addition, rodents can also consume and spoil crops, and serve as disease vectors that affect humans.  Starting in the 20th century,...

Date published: April 30, 2020
Status: Active

Bird Habitat Needs in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

Historically the Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV) was predominantly bottomland hardwood forest and most birds of conservation concern depend on bottomland hardwood forest. Past conservation planning has focused on habitat objectives with presumption that bird population goals would be met by habitat provision.

Date published: April 30, 2020
Status: Active

Monitoring Birds in National Parks of the Gulf Coast Network

The Challenge: Avian monitoring within the Gulf Coast Network of the National Park Service is challenged to provide valid quantitative data on bird populations within park boundaries with limited financial input. Thus, citizen science (volunteer) bird monitoring has been proposed to achieve reliable estimates of bird populations and to assess the effects of habitat change and temporal dynamics...

Date published: April 30, 2020
Status: Active

Forest Structure Resulting from ‘Wildlife Forestry Silviculture’

Wildlife forestry is management of forest resources, within sites and across landscapes, to provide sustainable, desirable habitat conditions for all forest-dependent (silvicolous) fauna while concurrently yielding economically viable, quality timber products. In practice, however, management decisions associated with wildlife forestry often reflect a desire to provide suitable habitat for...

Date published: April 16, 2020
Status: Active

Integrating colony counts with NABat acoustic data to reveal the true impacts of White-Nose Syndrome on northern long-eared bats

Bat Research

Research collaboration: Brian Reichert (FORT), Wayne Thogmartin (UMESC), Winifred Frick (Bat Conservation International), Tina Cheng (Bat Conservation International)

The northern long-eared bat...

Date published: April 16, 2020
Status: Active

Modeling the response of cave hibernating Myotis species to white-nose syndrome mitigation tactics

Bat Research

Research collaboration: Robin Russell (NWHC), Tonie Rocke (NWHC), Wayne Thogmartin (UMESC), Evan Grant (PWRC)

White-nose syndrome is a fungal disease devastating cave-hibernating bat species (Myotis spp.) in the eastern...

Date published: April 10, 2020
Status: Active

The response of coastal wetlands to sea-level rise: Understanding how macroscale drivers influence local processes and feedbacks

The purpose of this work is to advance our understanding of how coastal wetland responses to SLR within the conterminous United States are likely to vary as a function of local, regional, and macroscale drivers, including climate. Based on our interactions with managers and decision makers, as well as our knowledge of the current state of the science, we propose to (a) conduct a national...

Date published: April 8, 2020
Status: Active

Rafinesque’s Mammals

The Challenge: Taxonomic nomenclature relies, in part, upon an accurate taxonomic history in order to establish the correct name for a taxon. Constantine S. Rafinesque (1783–1840), was a knowledgeable North American natural historian who was is responsible for describing and naming such iconic American mammals as the mule deer [Odocoileus hemionus (Rafinesque, 1817)] and the white-footed mouse...