Kīlauea

Deformation Data

For more information on how electronic tiltmeters and GPS receivers help monitor the deformation of Kīlauea Volcano, see the HVO Deformation page. Click image for larger map. Data plots from additional stations are available from our interactive map. Use the right-side menu to view different types of data. 

Electronic Tilt at Kīlauea Summit - Past 2 Days

Electronic Tilt at Kīlauea Summit - Past 2 Days

Electronic Tilt at Kīlauea Summit and East Rift Zone - Past Week

Electronic Tilt at Kīlauea Summit and East Rift Zone - Past Week

Electronic Tilt at Kīlauea Summit and East Rift Zone - Past Month

Electronic Tilt at Kīlauea Summit and East Rift Zone - Past Month

Above: The blue line shows the radial tilt at Uwekahuna Station (UWE), on the western rim of Kīlauea's caldera. The green line is a radial tilt at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō (POO), north of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone. These are recorded by continuously operating electronic tiltmeters. Positive changes often indicate inflation of the magma storage areas beneath the caldera or Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, but may also result from heavy rainfall or, occasionally, instrumental malfunctions. 
 

Global Positioning System - Kīlauea Summit

Past Year

Global Positioning System - Kīlauea Summit - Past Year

Past Five Years

Global Positioning System - Kīlauea Summit - Past 5 Years

Global Positioning System - Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Cone

Past Year

Global Positioning System - Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Cone - Past Year

Past Five Years

Global Positioning System - Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Cone - Past Five Years

Above SUMMIT GPS: Change in distance between two Global Positioning System (GPS) stations located on opposite sides of Kīlauea's caldera. A rapid increase in distance can be interpreted as inflation of the summit magma reservoir or Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō magma storage chamber. Above Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō GPS: Change in distance between two station near Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. A rapid increase in distance can be interpreted as inflation of the summit magma reservoir Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō magma storage chamber. 

PUOC - Past 6 months

PUOC - Past 6 months

GPS station PUOC weathered the 2018 eruption, but recent data suggests it is slowly sliding into Pu'u 'O'o crater. You can see its southward progress, into the crater in the above plot. This motion is not directly related to magmatic activity at Pu'u 'O'o, but is interpreted to be sliding off the unstable edge of Pu'u 'O'o cone. This GPS station is very close to the edge of the crater, so it is not hugely surprising to see this happening after the big changes at Pu'u 'O'o in the summer of 2018.