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June 30, 2022

An eruption at Kīlauea's summit began at approximately 3:20 p.m. HST on September 29, 2021. Lava activity is confined within Halema‘uma‘u crater, in the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

HVO scientists collect detailed data to assess hazards and understand how the eruption is evolving at Kīlauea's summit, all of which are shared with the National Park Service and emergency managers. Access to this hazardous area is by permission from, and in coordination with, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

June 29, 2022 — Lava lake activity continues at Kīlauea summit

Color photograph of lava lake
This image shows the active lake surface of Halema‘uma‘u, as seen during a Kīlauea summit eruption observational field shift on June 29, 2022. The lava is flowing from left to right in this photo, and multiple areas of spatter can be seen (the red patches in the center of the photo and along the margin of the lake). The active lake is 23 feet (7 meters) below the rest of the lake surface. The main portion of the lake is 3 feet (1 meter) above the small pinched out section. USGS photo by L. Gallant.
Color photograph of volcanic vent
This image shows a small hornito degassing on the surface of Halema‘uma‘u crater floor, at the summit of Kīlauea. Hornitos are small, rootless cones that are fed by the tube network within the lava lake. Alteration from the persistent degassing is what causes some of the variation and color you can see in the area around the hornito (note the yellows and reds). USGS photo by L. Gallant.
Color photograph of lava lake
This image shows spattering on the active lake surface of Halema‘uma‘u, as seen during a Kīlauea summit observational field shift on June 29, 2022. The areas between the smooth, silvery plates on the surface spatter vigorously as these plates get dragged down into the molten lake and new plates of rapidly cooled lava form in their place. USGS photo by L. Gallant.