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Date published: October 26, 2007

USGS HVO Press Release — Magnitude-4.0 Earthquake beneath the South Flank of Kīlauea Volcano

A magnitude-4.0 earthquake was located beneath the south flank of Kīlauea Volcano by the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) on Thursday, October 25, at 6:57 p.m. HST.

Date published: October 11, 2007

Volcano Watch — At Kīlauea, it's always "Time to make the doughnuts"

Some years ago, a series of commercials for a popular doughnut shop was aired on television. In the scene, Fred the baker would leave his house early in the day, reciting the line "Time to make the doughnuts," and would return late in the day, depleted, saying "I made the doughnuts."

Date published: October 4, 2007

Volcano Watch — How much lava is being erupted at the July 21 fissure?

This has been a popular question posed by scientist and citizen alike but is currently a difficult one to answer accurately. It is also one of the most important quantities to monitor during an eruption. For example, the advance rate and ultimate length of `a`a flows are controlled by eruption rate.

Date published: September 20, 2007

Photo and Video Chronology - Kīlauea - September 20, 2007

Dome fountain over Fissure D vent of the Episode 58 eruption.

Date published: September 13, 2007

Volcano Watch — Kīlauea's eruption building perched lava channel and feeding many short flows

Lava flows from the ongoing eruption of Kīlauea Volcano have traveled only short distances during the past week from the impressive open lava channel that developed in late July.

Date published: September 8, 2007

Photo and Video Chronology - Kīlauea - September 8, 2007

Long-term evolution of the Episode 58 lava channel.

Date published: September 6, 2007

Volcano Watch — Almost nothing is enough: reticulite helps measure depth of Kīlauea's caldera 500 years ago

Pumice is glassy volcanic ejecta so full of bubbles that it floats in water. Reticulite is an extreme form of pumice in which all bubbles have burst and become interconnected, tenuously held together by glassy threads. The resulting high permeability causes reticulite to sink quickly in water despite its light weight, like chicken wire—there's almost nothing there, but it sinks anyway.

Date published: August 30, 2007

Volcano Watch — New report details July 21 fissure eruption hazards

For the past six weeks, lava erupting from a fissure east of Pu`u `O`o has been flowing on the surface through an open channel and feeding a series of `a`a flows.

Date published: August 23, 2007

Volcano Watch — Oldest radiometric ages from Kīlauea about 275,000 years

On an active volcano like Kīlauea, it's easy to point to the youngest volcanic features. Although the specific lava flow or vent may change daily, its age is "now." But looking back is more difficult for geologists. How far into Kīlauea's history can we see?

Date published: August 16, 2007

Volcano Watch — Kīlauea's south flank earthquakes more common than hurricanes

Early Wednesday morning, as most island residents slept peacefully in the knowledge that we were to be spared by hurricane Flossie, some of us were jolted awake by yet another earthquake. This was a magnitude-4.4 quake beneath the south flank of Kīlauea. A larger earthquake earlier in the week—a magnitude 5.4 on Monday evening—also occurred beneath Kīlauea's south flank.

Date published: August 15, 2007

USGS HVO Press Release — Magnitude-4.4 Earthquake on the South Flank of Kīlauea Volcano

The U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) recorded a magnitude-4.4 earthquakelocated beneath Kīlauea volcano's south flank on Wednesday, August 15, at 2:23 a.m. HST.

Date published: August 13, 2007

USGS HVO Press Release — Magnitude-5.4 Earthquake on the South Flank of Kīlauea Volcano

A magnitude-5.4 earthquake was located beneath the south flank of Kīlauea Volcano by the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory on Monday, August 13, at 7:38 p.m. HST.