Creating a Regional Network Focused on Climate Change and Invasive Species in the Pacific Northwest

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In a recently posted article, the Northwest CASC discusses the formation of the Pacific Northwest Regional Invasive Species and Climate Change (PNW RISCC) Network to incorporate climate change science into invasive species management in the region.

Gypsy moth caterpillar, invasive species in North America

Gypsy moth caterpillar, invasive species in North America. Credit: James Appleby, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

(Public domain.)

Read the original story posted by the Northwest CASC, here.

As non-native and invasive species establish themselves in new habitats under changing climate conditions, such as increasing wildfires, floods, droughts and other disturbances, resource managers are facing novel ecological challenges. In response, the Northwest CASC and partner have formed the Pacific Northwest Regional Invasive Species and Climate Change (PNW RISCC) Network to help natural resource managers and researchers incorporate climate change science into invasive species management. The PNW RISCC is modeled similarly to the previously established Northeast RISCC, as well as a Hawaii-based working group led by the Pacific Islands CASC.

The Northeast RISCC Network is already working to synthesize relevant science, create strong manager-scientist communities and conduct priority research to better prepare for the combined effects of invasive species and climate change in the Northeast region.  Building on this work, the PNW RISCC has established an Advisory Team and is working on a needs assessment survey to better prioritize research opportunities in the Northwest. While different regions’ invasive species may experience climate change impacts differently, pooling together knowledge from across the regional networks will be advantageous in bringing “the latest science and the most effective actions to improve outcomes and, ultimately, achieve conservation in the face of global climate change,” says Northeast CASC scientist Dr. Toni Lyn Morelli, founder of the Northeast RISCC Network.

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