Visiting Russian Scholar Studying Ferromanganese Crusts and Nodules from the Arctic Ocean

Release Date:

Natalia Konstantinova is currently a Ph.D. student at the Institute of Earth Sciences at Saint Petersburg State University in Russia. Her academic advisor is Georgy Cherkashov, professor at the university, and her thesis advisor is James Hein, research geologist at the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center in Santa Cruz, California.

This article is part of the October-December 2016 issue of the Sound Waves newsletter.

Illustration showing an ocean with its features and the surrounding continents and islands in relief.

Arctic Ocean. Base map from North Circumpolar Region (2008), Atlas of Canada, Natural Resources Canada.

Natalia Konstantinova has joined the USGS Pacific Coastal Marine Science Center in Santa Cruz, California, as a visiting scholar. Konstantinova is currently a Ph.D. student at the Institute of Earth Sciences at Saint Petersburg State University in Russia, where she received a bachelor’s degree in 2010 and a master’s degree in 2012. She investigates marine mineral deposits, particularly ferromanganese crusts—iron- and manganese-rich deposits that precipitate extremely slowly from cold seawater onto hard rock surfaces. Ferromanganese crusts form on seamounts, ridges, and plateaus throughout the global ocean.

Konstantinova’s academic advisor is Georgy Cherkashov, professor at Saint Petersburg State University, and her thesis advisor is James Hein, research geologist at the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center in Santa Cruz, California. After receiving her master’s degree, Konstantinova was invited by Cherkashov to work at the I.S. Gramberg Institute for Geology and Mineral Resources of the Ocean, where she gained further experience in geological and oceanographic research. Konstantinova is now able to work part-time at the I.S. Gramberg Institute while pursuing a Ph.D.

Konstantinova is currently studying ferromanganese crusts from the Mendeleev Ridge in the western Arctic Ocean to better understand the nature and origin of these deposits. Konstantinova’s work at the USGS is funded through a nine-month Fulbright Fellowship with Hein, who is a world expert on marine ferromanganese deposits. Together, they will determine how the complex and unique characteristics of the Arctic Ocean produce crusts and nodules that are unlike any others formed throughout the global ocean. Konstantinova and Hein will also compare samples obtained from the Mendeleev Ridge during a 2012 Russian Arctic cruise with samples recovered from the Chukchi Plateau and Alpha Ridge during extended U.S. Continental Shelf cruises in 2008, 2009, and 2012.

A smiling young woman squats on a stony beach with walrus behind her.

Natalia Konstantinova on Bennett Island during a 2014 scientific expedition in the East Siberian Sea.

Related Content

Filter Total Items: 1
Date published: July 15, 2019
Status: Active

Global Ocean Mineral Resources

Addressing issues concerning mineral resources that occur within the Exclusive Economic Zone of Pacific coastal States, Pacific islands of U.S. affiliation, and areas beyond national jurisdictions.

Filter Total Items: 1
Date published: December 30, 2016

Sound Waves Newsletter - October-December 2016

Before-and-after Hurricane Matthew coastal photos of the southeastern states, working with Indian government’s gas hydrates drilling expedition, using historical photos to measure coastal erosion, identifying stable areas of the seafloor for wind turbines, USGS participates in summertime Science Stroll event on Cape Cod, and more and this issue October-December 2016 issue of Sound Waves...