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Pacific Islands Water Science Center

The USGS Pacific Islands Water Science Center conducts hydrologic monitoring and investigative studies on a wide variety of issues affecting water resources in the State of Hawaiʻi and the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands. In partnership with Federal, State, and local agencies, the USGS provides data and information to assist these agencies in managing water resources.

News

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Community Meeting for Reimagining Molokaʻi's Wetlands

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USGS Unveils Mobile Flood Tool for the Nation

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Adaptive management strategies for potential impacts of climate change on Guam

Publications

Long-term groundwater availability in the Waihe‘e, ‘Īao, and Waikapū aquifer systems, Maui, Hawai‘i

Groundwater levels have declined since the 1940s in the Wailuku area of central Maui, Hawai‘i, on the eastern flank of West Maui volcano, mainly in response to increased groundwater withdrawals. Available data since the 1980s also indicate a thinning of the freshwater lens and an increase in chloride concentrations of pumped water from production wells. These trends, combined with projected increa

Water-budget accounting for tropical regions model (WATRMod) documentation

Regional groundwater recharge commonly is estimated using a threshold-type water-budget approach in which groundwater recharge is assumed to occur when water in the plant-root zone exceeds the soil’s moisture storage capacity. A water budget of the plant-soil system accounts for water inputs (rainfall, fog interception, irrigation, septic-system leachate, and other inputs), water outputs (runoff,

January 18, 2022, Red Hill synoptic groundwater-level survey, Hālawa area, O‘ahu, Hawai‘i

On January 18, 2022, groundwater levels were measured in selected wells in the Hālawa area, O‘ahu, Hawai‘i, constituting a synoptic groundwater-level survey (shortened herein to “synoptic survey”) of the area. Groundwater levels were measured mainly from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (times listed in Hawai‘i standard time) and provide a snapshot of groundwater levels during the survey period. Following

Science

River Loads into Puget Sound

The Issue: Puget Sound, WA, is the second largest estuary in the United States and its unique geology, climate, and nutrient-rich waters sustain biologically-productive terrestrial, coastal, and marine habitats. Development and associated human activities have significantly degraded the Sound, causing declines in fish and wildlife populations, water-quality issues, and losses of critical habitats...
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River Loads into Puget Sound

The Issue: Puget Sound, WA, is the second largest estuary in the United States and its unique geology, climate, and nutrient-rich waters sustain biologically-productive terrestrial, coastal, and marine habitats. Development and associated human activities have significantly degraded the Sound, causing declines in fish and wildlife populations, water-quality issues, and losses of critical habitats...
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