Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center

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Date published: October 5, 2018

Large underwater experiment in Monterey Canyon shows turbidity currents involve seafloor movement

Large underwater experiment in California’s Monterey Canyon shows that “turbidity currents” are not just currents, but involve movement of the seafloor itself.

September 30, 2018

Sound Waves Newsletter - September 2018

Scientists from the USGS and six research partners publish a paper summarizing a half-decade of changes to the shape and sediment of the Elwha River after dam removal, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory team spearhead Kīlauea eruption monitoring and data-analysis efforts, USGS scientists receive DOI Award for Elwha River dam-removal study, and more in this September 2018 issue of Sound Waves.

Date published: September 28, 2018

Sound Waves Newsletter - September 2018

Elwha River is still changing 5 years after two dams were removed, interagency drone pilots assist USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in monitoring and mapping efforts of the Kīlauea eruption, DOI award goes to Elwha River Science Team for their work to understand and explain the effects of dam removal on the Elwha River in Washington, and more in this September 2018 issue of Sound Waves...

Date published: September 28, 2018

Moving Mountains: Elwha River Still Changing Five Years After World’s Largest Dam-Removal Project

Starting in 2011, the National Park Service removed two obsolete dams, the world’s largest dam-removal project to date. Over the next five years, water carrying newly freed rocks, sand, silt, and old tree trunks reshaped more than 13 miles of river and built a larger delta into the Pacific Ocean.

Date published: September 27, 2018

USGS surveys the southern Monterey Bay coast to study changing beaches

From September 12–14, scientists from the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center used all-terrain vehicles and small watercraft to map the sand on beaches and under the water in southern Monterey Bay.

Date published: September 21, 2018

Congressman Jimmy Panetta visits USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center

On September 18, Congressman Jimmy Panetta (20th district, California) and staffer Emmanuel Garcia visited the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center in Santa Cruz.

Date published: September 12, 2018

USGS coastal flood maps assist emergency planning for Hurricane Lane

As Hurricane Lane approached Hawaiʻi, personnel in the Honolulu Emergency Operations Center on Oahu contacted Curt Storlazzi of the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center to ask for information on potential coastal flooding that could help them direct emergency-management services to areas of higher risk.

Date published: September 7, 2018

Hurricane Maria’s impacts on deep-water coral reefs off Puerto Rico

USGS research geologist Curt Storlazzi was quoted in an August 22 Nature news article about Hurricane Maria’s effects on deep-water coral reefs off Puerto Rico.

Date published: September 7, 2018

USGS-NOAA cruise maps Cascadia subduction zone to assess earthquake hazards

From July 31 to August 23, a joint USGS-NOAA cruise mapped seafloor depths, texture, and gas seeps in the Cascadia subduction zone offshore of Washington, Oregon, and northern California.

Date published: September 7, 2018

USGS and NASA researchers meet to discuss Synthetic Aperture Radar for assessing USGS coastal-flooding projections

USGS and NASA researchers met July 16 at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to discuss Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery of the Southern California coast collected during higher-than-normal tides (“king tides”) in fall 2016.

Date published: September 5, 2018

Moving Mountains: Elwha River Still Changing Five Years After World’s Largest Dam-Removal Project: More than 20 million tons of sediment flushed to the sea

Starting in 2011, the National Park Service removed two obsolete dams from the Elwha River in Olympic National Park, Washington. It was the world’s largest dam-removal project. Over the next five years, water carrying newly freed rocks, sand, silt and old tree trunks reshaped more than 13 miles of river and built a larger delta into the Pacific Ocean.