Carbon Dioxide for General Aquatic Invasive Species Control

Science Center Objects

Asian Carp Control: Carbon Dioxide

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is being evaluated as a new fishery chemical for general aquatic invasive species control. Most research has focused on its effectiveness as a behavioral deterrent and lethal control or invasive Asian carps. However, because CO2 is generally non-selective, there is potential for this new control chemical to be applied across a wide range of aquatic invasive species challenges.

Red swamp crayfish collected during field evaluation of CO2 as a deterrent in Michigan.

Red swamp crayfish collected during field evaluation of CO2 as a deterrent in Michigan.

(Public domain.)

The goal of this project is to evaluate CO2 as a control chemical to address aquatic invasive species needs identified by natural resource managers across the United States. Studies are conducted in laboratories, outdoor ponds, and field settings to collect data on toxicity, behavioral manipulation, and other beneficial endpoints that support aquatic invasive species control. Examples of studies range from behavioral deterrence of CO2 with invasive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus), lethality of CO2 with invasive zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha), and behavioral stimulation of invasive red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii).

Rusty crayfish used in lab CO2 deterrent trials.

Rusty crayfish used in lab CO2 deterrent trials.

(Public domain.)

Round goby being measured after use in lab CO2 deterrent trials.

Round goby being measured after use in lab CO2 deterrent trials.

(Public domain.)

Zebra mussels being put on plates for use in evaluation of CO2 as a control method.

Zebra mussels being put on plates for use in evaluation of CO2 as a control method.

(Public domain.)

Zebra mussels attached to plates for use in evaluation of CO2 as a control method.

Zebra mussels attached to plates for use in evaluation of CO2 as a control method.

(Public domain.)