Can I join the USGS?

As a science agency for the United States government, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) serves all United States citizens. The USGS can only be “joined” by its employees, but citizens can get involved in USGS research through its Citizen Science programs. Some USGS Citizen Science opportunities are also listed on the Volunteer.gov website.

Keep up with the latest USGS science by subscribing to our many social media platforms.

All paid USGS positions are advertised through the USAJOBS website.

 

Related Content

Filter Total Items: 10

Do you have any citizen science programs in which my students can participate?

Absolutely! The USGS has partnerships with several citizen science programs that are appropriate for classroom projects or for individual students. See the Citizen Science page on our USGS Education website .

Does the USGS offer field trips or classes?

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) does not have a formal program for providing field trips or classes. USGS employees will sometimes lead field trips or teach classes that are organized by outside organizations, but those are not advertised by the USGS. The USGS also has many published field-trip guides to geologic areas. Use our online...

Can I visit a USGS office?

Very few U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) offices are set up to accommodate visitors. Before stopping by a USGS office, you should check their website or call ahead to make sure that visitors are welcome. There are USGS offices in each state. Members of the public are welcome to use libraries that are located at some USGS offices , but materials can...

Can I volunteer with the USGS?

The Volunteer.gov website is the best starting point for volunteer positions with the United States federal government. However, many USGS volunteer positions are not formally announced, so they do not appear on that site. You could try contacting a local USGS office directly to ask about possible volunteer opportunities. Another way to get...

Where are USGS offices located?

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) has offices in every state . Our headquarters is located in Reston, Virginia.

How do I contact the USGS?

For general inquiries, call 1-888-ASK-USGS (1-888-275-8747). You can also use this website to send us a message or to initiate a live Web chat with a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Science Information Specialist. Most of our employees are listed in our online Staff Profiles . USGS offices are located in every state. Please note, however, that most...

Where can I find information on employment with the USGS?

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is a Federal science agency in the U.S. Department of the Interior that provides impartial information on the health of our ecosystems and environment, the natural hazards that threaten us, the natural resources we rely on, the impacts of climate and land-use change, and the core science systems that help...

What information does the USGS have about careers in science?

Find information and inspiring stories about USGS science careers at these websites: USGS Career Cards USGS Employment and Information Center Students and Youth at the USGS (YouTube playlist) A Snapshot of Women of the U.S. Geological Survey in STEM and related careers Virtual Job Shadow (videos) See the below Related Content Multimedia tab for...

Do you have internships, summer positions, or volunteer positions for teachers or students?

The USGS does not have any positions specifically targeted to teachers, but motivated teachers can sometimes find volunteer positions by contacting our scientists directly. Student internships are designed for college-level students and recent graduates. Younger students are encouraged to explore our many citzen science and volunteer opportunities...

I am not a citizen of the United States. Can I apply for jobs in the USGS?

As a United States federal agency, the USGS is not permitted to hire non-U.S. citizens except in very rare circumstances.
Filter Total Items: 6
A citizen-scientist collects field data
February 23, 2017

A citizen-scientist collects field data

A Nature's Notebook citizen-scientist collects field data to be used in research by the USA-National Phenology Network. 

iCoast allows citizen scientists to identify changes to the coast by comparing aerial photographs taken before and after storms.
December 7, 2016

iCoast allows citizen scientists to identify changes to the coast

iCoast allows citizen scientists to identify changes to the coast by comparing aerial photographs taken before and after storms.

citizen scientist fieldwork
May 20, 2014

Citizen scientist collecting samples of amphibian and dragonfly larvae

Researchers are using citizen scientists to help sample amphibians and dragonfly larvae to investigate whether wildlife exposure to mercury is causing toxicological responses in wildlife. They are also assessing landscape factors that drive mercury production and bioaccumulation by studying mercury concentrations from a range of lakes and wetlands throughout the Nation.

video thumbnail: USGS Public Lecture Series: Watching Nature's Clock: A Citizen-Scientist Effort to Track Seasonal Signs of Climate Change
May 5, 2009

USGS Public Lecture Series: Watching Nature's Clock: A Citizen-Scientist Effort to Track Seasonal Signs of Climate Change

A new USGS program, the USA National Phenology Network, is recruiting tens of thousands of volunteers to team up with scientists to help track the effects of climate on seasonal patterns of plant and animal behavior. Come learn how you can contribute to this new national effort, by getting outside, and observing and recording flowering, fruiting and other seasonal events.

...
Attribution:
Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Migratory Bird Day

Citizen Science at the Salton Sea

Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Migratory Bird Day.

Citizen Scientists monitoring Avian populations in the Gulf Coast National Parks

Citizen Scientists monitoring Avian populations

Bird Counts: Birds are monitored annually to provide long-term assessment of bird populations.