Where can I find a fault map of the US? Is one available in GIS format?

An online map of US Quaternary Faults is available via the Quaternary Fault and Fold Database.  There is an interactive map application to view the faults online and a seperate database search function.  KML (Google Earth-type) files and GIS shape files are also available for download from the site.  The interactive map provides detailed reports for each fault by placing the cursor over the fault and clicking to bring up a link to the information.

Related Content

Filter Total Items: 9

Where are the fault lines in the Eastern United States (east of the Rocky Mountains)?

Faults are different from fault lines. A fault is a three-dimensional surface within the planet Earth. At the fault, rocks have broken. The rocks on one side of the fault have moved past the rocks on the other side. In contrast, a fault line is a line that stretches along the ground. The fault line is where the fault cuts the Earth's surface...

Why are there so many faults in the Quaternary Faults Database with the same name?

Many faults are mapped as individual segments across an area. These fault segments are given a different value for name, number, code, or dip direction and so in the database each segment occurs as its own unique entity. For example, the San Andreas Fault has several fault segments, from letters a to h, and fault segment 1h has segments with age...

Why are there no faults in the Great Valley of central California?

The Great Valley is a basin, initially forming some ~100 million years ago as a low area between the subducting ocean plate on the west (diving down under the North American plate) and the volcanoes to the east (now the Sierra Nevada mountains). Since its formation, the Great Valley has continued to be low in elevation. Starting about 15 million...

Why are there so many earthquakes and faults in the Western United States?

This region of the United States has been tectonically active since the supercontinent Pangea broke up roughly 200 million years ago, and in large part because it is close to the western boundary of the North American plate. Since the formation of the San Andreas Fault system 25-30 million years ago, the juxtaposition of the Pacific and North...

What is a "Quaternary" fault?

A Quaternary fault is one that has been recognized at the surface and which has moved in the past 1,600,000 years, a portion of the Quaternary epoch.

I am looking to buy land near the location of a large historical earthquake.  I am wondering where the fault line runs.  What is the seismic activity in the area today?  How did the quake change the contours and elevations of the area?

You will have to do some research on this yourself, either in journals or books or at another web site. A good first book reference in general for this sort of information is Stover and Coffman, (1993) Seismicity of the United States, 1568-1989 (Revised), U.S. Geological Survey professional Paper 1527. (This reference ought to be at a large...

How do I find fault or hazard maps for California?

An online map of faults that includes California can be found in the Faults section of the Earthquake Hazards Program website. Choose the Interactive Fault Map, or download KML files and GIS shapefiles from the links on the page. USGS seismic hazard maps, data and tools for California and other parts of the United States can be found in the...

What is a fault and what are the different types?

A fault is a fracture or zone of fractures between two blocks of rock. Faults allow the blocks to move relative to each other. This movement may occur rapidly, in the form of an earthquake - or may occur slowly, in the form of creep . Faults may range in length from a few millimeters to thousands of kilometers. Most faults produce repeated...

What is the relationship between faults and earthquakes?  What happens to a fault when an earthquake occurs?

Earthquakes occur on faults - strike-slip earthquakes occur on strike-slip faults, normal earthquakes occur on normal faults , and thrust earthquakes occur on thrust or reverse faults. When an earthquake occurs on one of these faults, the rock on one side of the fault slips with respect to the other. The fault surface can be vertical, horizontal,...
Filter Total Items: 6
Date published: March 27, 2014

Prior Great Earthquakes Unveiled at the Western Edge of the 1964 Alaska Rupture

Ever since the great magnitude 9.2 earthquake shook Alaska 50 years ago today, scientists have suspected that the quake's rupture halted at the southwestern tip of Kodiak Island due to a natural barrier.

Date published: July 10, 2012

Low-Flying Airplane Mapping Virginia’s Underground Faults Next 11 Days

MINERAL, Va. –Residents of Louisa, Goochland and Fluvanna counties may notice a low-flying airplane over the area the next 11 days as scientists from the U.S. Geological Surveymap the underground faults responsible for the region’s Aug. 23, 2011 earthquake. 

Date published: March 9, 2006

A Virtual Tour of the Hayward Fault

The U.S. Geological Survey has a new website that offers a virtual tour of the Hayward fault.

Date published: June 7, 2004

USGS Releases Quaternary Fault Database for the Nation

What are the faults in my state and where are they? When did they last have an earthquake? Now you can find out the answer to these questions online through a user-friendly interface developed by the USGS.

Date published: December 4, 2003

Cat Scan'-Like Seismic Study of Earthquake Zone Helps Set Stage for Fault Drilling Project

In a first of its kind study U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Duke University seismologists have used tiny "microearthquakes" along a section of California’s notorious San Andreas Fault to create unique images of the contorted geology scientists will face as they continue drilling deeper into the fault zone to construct a major earthquake "observatory.

Date published: November 7, 2002

Alaska Interior Reveals Scars and Ruptures from 7.9 Denali Fault Quake

Sunday’s magnitude 7.9 earthquake in central Alaska created a scar across the landscape for more than 145 miles, according to surveys conducted the past two days by geologists from the U.S. Geological Survey and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Survey.

Filter Total Items: 6
Shaded relief image of the Santa Rosa area showing active faults
April 14, 2016

Santa Rosa area showing active faults

Shaded relief image of the Santa Rosa area showing active faults (black lines) and the detailed rupture pattern of the Rodgers Creek Fault where it crosses central Santa Rosa (in red). The orange, bean-shaped area represents the dense, magnetic body of rock on the east side of the fault beneath Santa Rosa. This body of rock may be largely responsible for the pattern of

...
Image: USGS Geologists Inspecting Fault Trace in a Trench
May 26, 2015

USGS Geologists Inspecting Fault Trace in a Trench

View of geologists pointing to fault in a trench dug across one of the ruptures from the 2014 South Napa earthquake. From front to rear: Alexandra Pickering, Suzanne Hecker, Aaron Page (all USGS). Trench located approximately 3 miles NW of downtown Napa, CA.

Exposed faults
September 10, 2011

Exposed faults

Two faults (located on either side of project geologist Chris Fridrich) cutting Pleistocene fluvial gravels on the northern edge of the Poncha mountain block. These and other young faults exposed in area help reveal the latest kinematic (movement) and paleostress histories of the mountain block.

Image shows a map of the Great Basin with fault lines shown
November 30, 2000

Great Basin Fault Map

The map above shows the location of mapped faults and surficial geology of the central Mojave Desert region in southern California. 

 location of and evidence for recent movement on active fault traces within the Hayward Fault Zone, California

Traces of the Hayward Fault, California

The purpose of this map is to show the location of and evidence for recent movement on active fault traces within the Hayward Fault Zone, California.  The mapped traces represent the integration of the following three different types of data: (1) geomorphic expression, (2) creep (aseismic fault slip),and (3) trench exposures. 

Attribution: Natural Hazards
Map of known active geologic faults in the San Francisco Bay region

Map of known active geologic faults in the San Francisco Bay region

Map of known active geologic faults in the San Francisco Bay region, California, including the Hayward Fault.  The 72 percent probability of a magnitude (M) 6.7 or greater earthquake in the region includes well-known major plate-boundary faults, lesser-known faults, and unknown faults.  The percentage shown within each colored circle is the probability that a M 6.7 or

...