Earth Observation Case Study: Landsat to Map Ag. Yields and Irrigation

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Detailed Description

Social scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center – in collaboration with the USGS National Land Imaging Program – conduct Earth observation user case studies using qualitative research methods. Using standard scientific methods, they are better able to understand the variety of Earth observation users, including how they use and value Earth observation data.

This graphic illustration guides you through an Earth observation user case study and provides the in-depth user experience of Jill Deines – one example of an Earth observation user. Dr. Jill Deines is a postdoctoral scholar at the Center for Food Security and the Environment at Stanford University working jointly with the NASA Harvest Consortium, a multidisciplinary effort that works to use satellite Earth observations to support food security, agriculture, and human and environmental resiliency in the US and worldwide. Jill pivoted during her Ph.D. from being only a user of satellite-generated landscape products to producing them using cloud-based remote sensing tools to better answer her research questions about effectively managing agricultural resources. Today, Jill uses Landsat satellite imagery to reconstruct crop yield over the past 20 years to understand ongoing trends in agricultural production and examine alternative management approaches.

Landsat is a joint USGS/NASA Program that provides the longest continuous space-based record of Earth’s land surface. Every day, Landsat satellites provide essential information to help land managers and policy makers make decisions about resources and the environment.
 

Details

Date Taken:

Length: 00:03:31

Location Taken: Standford, CA, US

Transcript

Frame 1 (00:00 - 00:04)

USGS Science for a changing world 

 

Frame 2 (00:04 - 00:08)

The views and opinions expressed in this video are those of the authors and do not necessarily state or reflect the official policy or position of any agency of the U.S. Government, and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes.

 

Reference in this video to any specific commercial product, process, or service, or the use of any trade, firm or corporation name, or otherwise, is for the information and convenience of the public, and does not constitute endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government.

 

Frame 3 (00:09-00:39)

Social scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center - in collaboration with the USGS National Land Imaging Program - conduct earth observation user case studies using qualitative research methods.

 

Using these standard scientific methods (interviews, archival research, participant observation, social network analysis, focus groups, surveys, systems thinking), they are better able to understand the variety of earth observation users, including how they use and value earth observation data.

 

The following earth observation user case study provides the in-depth user experience of Jill Deines - one example of an earth observation user.

 

Frame 4 (00:40 - 00:45)

Landsat is a USGS/NASA Satellite that records what’s happening on the Earth’s surface over time.

 

Jill Deines: Using Landsat to map agricultural yields and irrigation use

 

Frame 5 (00:46 - 00:55)

This is Jill Deines.

Jill grew up in the midwest surrounded by cornfields.

 

Frame 6 (00:56 - 01:05)

At age 17, Jill flew for the first time and got a bird’s-eye view of the cornfields near her home.

 

Frame 7 (01:06 - 01:15

After earning her master’s degree, Jill learned about remote sensing.

 

Frame 8 (01:16 - 01:27)

Jill’s research aims to improve the effective management of agricultural resources. 

 

Irrigation. Soil health. Food production.

 

Frame 9 (01:28 - 1:40)

Jill combines Landsat and other geospatial data to help answer her research questions. 

 

Landsat provides the data that she needs through high-quality, consistent, long-term observations.

 

Frame 10 (01:40 - 02:00)

As part of her PhD, Jill mapped agricultural irrigation use in the Ogallala aquifer using Landsat.

 

Frame 11 (02:00 - 02:15)

Landsat imagery became free for everyone in 2008. Before Landsat’s free and open data policy, Jill’s research would have been nearly impossible.

 

Without free Landsat, her research would have cost over $60 million!

 

Frame 12 (02:16 - 02:25)

Jill now works as a research scientist using Landsat to examine crop productivity, food security, and agricultural decision-making.

 

Frame 13 (02:25 - 02:40)

Her research using Landsat shows that improved groundwater management and reduced tillage can preserve water resources and crop yields without hurting farmers’ profits.

Frame 14 (02:41 - 02:51)

Jill’s research helps farmers make informed management decisions to preserve their land for future generations.

 

Frame 15 (02:51 - 03:05)

Jill’s future is wide open.

 

She is currently at Stanford University and works with the NASA Harvest consortium.

Jill continues to use satellite imagery to help farmers answer their most important questions.

 

Frame 16 (03:05 - 03:19)

To learn more about Jill’s work and Landsat, go to: 

 

Landsat.usgs.gov

and 

Twitter.com/LadiesofLandsat

Twitter.com/JillDeines

 

This video was brought to you by USGS (science for a changing world)

And was illustrated by Heartwood Visuals.

 

Frame 17 (03:20 - 03:31)

USGS Science for a changing world