Image of the Week - Festive Fields in North Carolina

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Detailed Description

The smell of a fresh cut Christmas tree can evoke visions of majestic evergreen forests teeming with winter wildlife. In truth, more than half of U.S. Christmas trees come from farms in Oregon, North Carolina, or Michigan. Cut Christmas Trees area commodity, tracked by the U.S. Department of Agriculture just like corn or soybeans. These USDA aerial images show tree harvest patterns over 12 years in Ashe County, North Carolina where it takes an average of 7 years for a tree to grow to a sellable height. Harvest patterns are not always uniform. In some areas, trees are harvested from one field while those in neighboring fields are left to grow. On other fields, the trees are thinned over time. Aerial imagery from the USDA is archived by EROS and available to the public at no charge, at Christmas time, or any time at all.
 

Details

Date Taken:

Length: 00:00:57

Location Taken: Ashe County, NC, US

Video Credits

John Hult, Writer & Voicover; Randolph Femmer, Mountain Photo
 

Transcript

The smell of a fresh cut Christmas tree can evoke visions of majestic evergreen forests teeming with winter wildlife. In truth, more than half of U.S. Christmas trees come from farms in Oregon, North Carolina, or Michigan.

Cut Christmas Trees area commodity, tracked by the U.S. Department of Agriculture just like corn or soybeans. These USDA aerial images show tree harvest patterns over 12 years in Ashe County, North Carolina where it takes an average of 7 years for a tree to grow to a sellable height. Harvest patterns are not always uniform. In some areas, trees are harvested from one field while those in neighboring fields are left to grow. On other fields, the trees are thinned over time. 

Aerial imagery from the USDA is archived by EROS and available to the public at no charge, at Christmas time, or any time at all.