Cascades Volcano Observatory

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Filter Total Items: 114
Date published: January 25, 2021

A Geophysicist's Perspective on Mount Hood Monitoring Stations and the Recent Earthquake Swarm

A CVO geophysicist discusses how the monitoring stations installed at Mount Hood in 2020 provide insight into the recent Mount Hood earthquake swarm.

Date published: January 25, 2021

Upcoming Series of Virtual Talks Focuses on Mount St. Helens and Volcano Monitoring

Beginning in February 2021, CVO staff will provide virtual webinars about Mount St. Helens' May 18, 1980 eruption and how the volcano has shaped the study of volcanoes and volcano monitoring, as part of the Whidbey Reads program.

Date published: January 17, 2021

January 17, 2021 Mount Hood Earthquake Swarm

An earthquake swarm at Mount Hood is ongoing. The earthquakes are associated with regional faulting and are not a sign of changes in volcanic activity.

Date published: January 14, 2021

New Scientist-in-Charge at USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory

The U.S. Geological Survey is pleased to announce the selection of Dr. Jon Major to serve as the new Scientist-in-Charge of the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory.

Date published: November 13, 2020

Three new monitoring stations installed at Mount Hood

These stations enhance the existing monitoring network at this high-threat volcano and improve the ability of CVO scientists and their partners to detect and provide warning of any changes in earthquake activity or ground deformation that may signal an increase in volcanic activity and a subsequent danger to people and property.

Date published: October 19, 2020

Trump Administration Officials Tour New Mt. Rainier Lahar Detection Stations

TACOMA, Wash. — Deputy Secretary of the Interior Katharine MacGregor, U.S. Geological Survey Director Jim Reilly, and Counselor to the Secretary Margaret Everson, Exercising the Delegated Authority of the Director of the National Park Service, today visited Mount Rainier National Park to announce the successful permitting and ongoing installation of five new lahar monitoring stations.

Date published: October 16, 2020

Media Advisory: Exclusive Interview Opportunities with Interior Officials to Learn about New Mt. Rainier Lahar Detection Stations

TACOMA, Wash. — What is a lahar and why are they a threat to those who live below Mount Rainier? Journalists are invited to learn about the  threat potential posed by lahars from Mount Rainier to local communities and how  new  USGS lahar monitoring stations will integrate into emergency preparedness and response.    

Date published: October 16, 2020

New station enhances Mount Rainier’s lahar detection network

New station expands scientists' capabilities to detect unrest and provide rapid notification of hazards to emergency officials and the public.

Date published: October 5, 2020

Opportunity for public comment on proposal to expand the lahar detection system within Mount Rainier National Park

Public input will be accepted from October 5-30, 2020 on a proposal to expand the lahar detection system inside Mount Rainier National Park.  

Date published: September 1, 2020

Newberry gets new names for some of its many geologic features.

Evidence for early Holocene human occupation in the Newberry caldera provides the context for USGS geologist's work with the Klamath Tribes and the Deschutes National Forest to add tribal names describing geologic features that help tell the story of its many volcanic eruptions.   

Date published: August 7, 2020

Low lake water, dry conditions in Newberry caldera the cause of increased sulfur smells?

Field crews set up temporary gas monitoring sensors and sample hot springs and seeps, soils, and areas where sulfur smells were reported. Preliminary data show little change from previous years and monitoring effort will continue.