Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Earthquake Processes and Effects

Crustal deformation, ground motion, ground failure, and the effects of earthquakes.

Filter Total Items: 8

Earthquake Processes and Effects - Overview

The high level of earthquake activity and the complexity of the fault systems throughout California area provides a unique natural laboratory for the study of the physics of earthquakes.
link

Earthquake Processes and Effects - Overview

The high level of earthquake activity and the complexity of the fault systems throughout California area provides a unique natural laboratory for the study of the physics of earthquakes.
Learn More

Neogene Deformation History of Western North America and Volcanism in Coastal California

These movies animate a model we created to both reconstruct the geography of California through time and to aid predictions about how it will change in the future.
link

Neogene Deformation History of Western North America and Volcanism in Coastal California

These movies animate a model we created to both reconstruct the geography of California through time and to aid predictions about how it will change in the future.
Learn More

Rock Physics Lab

There are currently two main Experimental Rock Physics Laboratories in the Earthquake Science Center in Menlo Park, California. These laboratories specialize in generating earthquakes under controlled conditions.
link

Rock Physics Lab

There are currently two main Experimental Rock Physics Laboratories in the Earthquake Science Center in Menlo Park, California. These laboratories specialize in generating earthquakes under controlled conditions.
Learn More

San Francisco Bay Area Arrays and the East Bay Seismic Experiment

Portable Seismograph Deployments to Research the Effects of Basins, Topography, and Fault Zones on Seismic Waves. The implosion of the Warren Hall building on California State University East Bay (CSU-EB) campus in August of 2013 provided an excellent opportunity to use a “free” seismic source that was practically located on the Hayward Fault.
link

San Francisco Bay Area Arrays and the East Bay Seismic Experiment

Portable Seismograph Deployments to Research the Effects of Basins, Topography, and Fault Zones on Seismic Waves. The implosion of the Warren Hall building on California State University East Bay (CSU-EB) campus in August of 2013 provided an excellent opportunity to use a “free” seismic source that was practically located on the Hayward Fault.
Learn More

Ground Movement and Ground Shaking

Measureable permanent ground displacements are produced by shallow earthquakes of magnitude 5 and greater. These displacements are used by seismologists to understand the earthquake source in detail. Past earthquakes have shown that the amplification of motions due to surface-to-bedrock geology, 3D crustal structure, and topography have a major influence on seismic damage and loss in urban areas.
link

Ground Movement and Ground Shaking

Measureable permanent ground displacements are produced by shallow earthquakes of magnitude 5 and greater. These displacements are used by seismologists to understand the earthquake source in detail. Past earthquakes have shown that the amplification of motions due to surface-to-bedrock geology, 3D crustal structure, and topography have a major influence on seismic damage and loss in urban areas.
Learn More

Cone Penetration Testing (CPT)

This research focuses on the ability to determine what areas are more prone to experiencing effects such as liquefaction and landslides when there is shaking from an earthquake.
link

Cone Penetration Testing (CPT)

This research focuses on the ability to determine what areas are more prone to experiencing effects such as liquefaction and landslides when there is shaking from an earthquake.
Learn More

Tracking Stress Buildup and Crustal Deformation

The constant plate tectonic motions between the Pacific and North American plates guarantees that the crust in the western US is continually building up stress. Crustal deformation refers to the changing earth’s surface caused by tectonic forces that are accumulated in the crust and then cause earthquakes.
link

Tracking Stress Buildup and Crustal Deformation

The constant plate tectonic motions between the Pacific and North American plates guarantees that the crust in the western US is continually building up stress. Crustal deformation refers to the changing earth’s surface caused by tectonic forces that are accumulated in the crust and then cause earthquakes.
Learn More

Fault Slip Rates and Post-Earthquake Motions

Earth’s crust typically moves a few millimeters to centimeters per year. In an actively deforming continental region, the crust often behaves like a set of nearly-rigid blocks separated by faults. After a large earthquake, the crust does not stop moving. The slip that occurs during the aftershocks that follow is called afterslip.
link

Fault Slip Rates and Post-Earthquake Motions

Earth’s crust typically moves a few millimeters to centimeters per year. In an actively deforming continental region, the crust often behaves like a set of nearly-rigid blocks separated by faults. After a large earthquake, the crust does not stop moving. The slip that occurs during the aftershocks that follow is called afterslip.
Learn More