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Earthquake Hazards

The USGS monitors and reports on earthquakes, assesses earthquake impacts and hazards, and conducts targeted research on the causes and effects of earthquakes. We undertake these activities as part of the larger National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), a four-agency partnership established by Congress.

News

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USGS Seeks Earthquake Hazards Research Proposals

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Take a Tour of the Earthquake Hazards Program Site

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Magnitude 7.3 Earthquake near Namie, Japan

Publications

Improved resolution across the Global Seismographic Network: A new era in low-frequency seismology

The Global Seismographic Network (GSN)—a global network of ≈150 very broadband stations—is used by researchers to study the free oscillations of the Earth (≈0.3–10 mHz) following large earthquakes. Normal‐mode observations can provide information about the radial density and anisotropic velocity structure of the Earth (including near the core–mantle boundary), but only when signal‐to‐noise ratios

Considerations for creating equitable and inclusive communication campaigns associated with ShakeAlert, the earthquake early warning system for the West Coast of the USA

PurposeThe 2019 Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction (GAR) cites earthquakes as the most damaging natural hazard globally, causing billions of dollars of damage and killing thousands of people. Earthquakes have the potential to drastically impact physical, social and economic landscapes; to reduce this risk, earthquake early warning (EEW) systems have been developed. However, these

Insights into the geometry and evolution of the southern San Andreas Fault from geophysical data, southern California

Two new joint gravity-magnetic models in northern Coachella Valley provide additional evidence for a steep northeast dip of the Mission Creek strand of the southern San Andreas fault (southern California, USA). Gravity modeling indicates a steep northeast dip of the Banning fault in the upper 1–2 km in northern Coachella Valley. The Mission Creek strand and its continuation to the southeast (Coach