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Are existing modeling tools useful to evaluate outcomes in mangrove restoration and rehabilitation projects? A minireview

October 7, 2022

Ecosystem modeling is a critical process for understanding complex systems at spatiotemporal scales needed to conserve, manage, and restore ecosystem services (ESs). Although mangrove wetlands are sources of ESs worth billions of dollars, there is a lack of modeling tools. This is reflected in our lack of understanding of mangroves’ functional and structural attributes. Here, we discuss the “state of the art” of mangrove models used in the planning and monitoring of R/R projects during the last 30 years. The main objectives were to characterize the most frequent modeling approach, their spatiotemporal resolution, and their current utility/application in management decisions. We identified 281 studies in six broad model categories: conceptual, agent-based (ABM), process-based (PBM), spatial, statistical, and socioeconomic/management (ScoEco). The most widely used models are spatial and statistical, followed by PBM, ScoEco, and conceptual categories, while the ABMs were the least frequently used. Yet, the application of mangrove models in R/R projects since the early 1990s has been extremely limited, especially in the mechanistic model category. We discuss several approaches to help advance model development and applications, including the targeted allocation of potential revenue from global carbon markets to R/R projects using a multi-model and integrated approach.

Citation Information

Publication Year 2022
Title Are existing modeling tools useful to evaluate outcomes in mangrove restoration and rehabilitation projects? A minireview
DOI 10.3390/f13101638
Authors Victor H. Rivera-Monroy, Xiaochen Zhao, Hongqing Wang, Zuo G. Xue
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title Forests
Index ID 70237655
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Wetland and Aquatic Research Center