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Migration strategies and wintering areas of North American ospreys as revealed by satellite telemetry

January 1, 2000

Since 1995 we have trapped and tagged 110 Ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) from 12 study sites in 8 states (Fig. 1). This total includes 71 females, 32 males and 7 juveniles. Our study areas encompass the major Osprey population concentrations found in the United States including the Western States, the Great Lakes region and the Eastern Seaboard.

Tagging of nesting pairs along with three complete family groups revealed that departure times from nesting areas varied by gender; with females leaving before the juveniles and the
males departing last. Neither nesting pairs, nor families, migrated or wintered together (Fig. 2). Departure dates from the breeding areas ranged from 12 July to 1 October. Migration routes differed between populations but not gender (Fig. 3). Western Ospreys migrated through California and to a lesser degree other western states and then into Mexico. Minnesota
Ospreys migrated along three routes; 1) through the central U.S. and then along the east coast of Mexico, 2) along the Mississippi River then across the Gulf of Mexico, or 3) through the Southeastern U.S., then across the Caribbean. East Coast birds migrated along the Eastern Seaboard of the U.S. through Florida and across the Caribbean.

Citation Information

Publication Year 2000
Title Migration strategies and wintering areas of North American ospreys as revealed by satellite telemetry
DOI
Authors Mark S. Martell, Charles J. Henny, P. Nye, Matthew J. Solensky
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title Microwave Telemetry Newsletter
Series Number
Index ID 1016093
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center