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Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center (FRESC)

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Scientists from the Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center capitalize on their diverse expertise to answer scientific questions shaped by the environments of the western United States. We collaborate with each other and with partners to provide rigorous, objective, and timely information and guidance for the management and conservation of biological systems in the West and worldwide. 

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FRESC scientists, individually or collaboratively with partners, investigate high-priority questions about biological systems.

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Date published: December 21, 2018

A Spatially Continuous Model of Annual Streamflow Permanence Throughout the Pacific Northwest

An interdisciplinary team comprised of USGS and university scientists has developed the Probability of Streamflow Permanence Model or PROSPER which predicts flow permanence for unregulated and minimally impaired streams in the Pacific Northwest.

Date published: December 14, 2018

Guide to Bees of Southern Idaho

Bees are an important part of natural ecosystems and thriving agricultural systems in southwest Idaho and other areas of the United States. Both introduced and native bees can provide ecosystem services by pollinating native plants and agricultural crops such as fruit trees. 

Date published: December 7, 2018

Estimating Extinction Risk for Multiple Populations When Data for Traditional Population Viability Analyses are Unavailable

Population viability analysis (PVA) bridges the gap between theoretical and applied ecology and is used to make policy decisions on high-profile conservation efforts. However, it’s use is limited to a single or few populations with long-term data.

Publications

Year Published: 2018

Identification of bees in southwest Idaho—A guide for beginners

This document was prepared to help scientists and the public, both of whom may not be familiar with bee taxonomy, learn how to practically identify bees in sagebrush steppe and shrubland habitats in southwest Idaho. We provide information to identify bees to the level of family and genus. A tentative list of the bee genera captured at sites used...

Sun, Emily R.; Pilliod, David S.
Sun, E.R., and Pilliod, D.S., 2018, Identification of bees in southwest Idaho—A guide for beginners: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1448, 84 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/cir1448.

Year Published: 2018

Natural resource condition assessment: Olympic National Park

The Natural Resource Assessment Program aims to document condition and trends of selected park resources while identifying emerging issues and information needs. This information is intended to serve as a platform for natural resource managers to use in developing future resource stewardship priorities and planning.Olympic National Park (OLYM) on...

Mccaffery, Rebecca; Jenkins, Kurt J.

Year Published: 2018

Quantitative acoustic differentiation of cryptic species illustrated with King and Clapper rails

Reliable species identification is vital for survey and monitoring programs. Recently, the development of digital technology for recording and analyzing vocalizations has assisted in acoustic surveying for cryptic, rare, or elusive species. However, the quantitative tools that exist for species differentiation are still being refined. Using...

Stiffler, Lydia L.; Schroeder, Katie M.; Anderson, James T.; McRae, Susan B.; Katzner, Todd E.