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Notes on the geology and meteorology of sites infected with white-nose syndrome before July 2010 in Southeastern United States

January 1, 2011

Since 2006, numerous bat colonies in North America have experienced unusually high incidences of mortality. In these colonies, bats are infected by a white fungus named Geomyces destructans, which has been observed on bat muzzles, noses, ears, and (or) wings. Although it is not exactly certain how and why these bats are dying, this condition has been named white-nose syndrome (WNS). WNS appears to have spread from an initial infection site at a cave in New York, and was first identified south of Pennsylvania during January 2009. By the end of June 2010, 41 infected sites had identified in the states of West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, and Tennessee. Most of these sites are natural caves in limestone of either Cambrian-Ordovician age or Silurian-Devonian age. Published air temperature values in these WNS-infected caves range from -3.3 to 15.6 °C, and humidity measurements range from 68 to 100 %.

Citation Information

Publication Year 2011
Title Notes on the geology and meteorology of sites infected with white-nose syndrome before July 2010 in Southeastern United States
DOI
Authors Christopher S. Swezey, Christopher P. Garrity
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title NSS News
Series Number
Index ID 70044301
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Eastern Geology and Paleoclimate Science Center