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The role of seismic and slow slip events in triggering the 2018 M7.1 Anchorage earthquake in the Southcentral Alaska subduction zone

April 23, 2020

The M 7.1 2018 Anchorage earthquake occurred in the bending part of the subducting North Pacific plate near the geometrical barrier formed by the underthrusting Yakutat terrane. We calculate the triggering potential related with stress redistribution from deformation sources including the M 9.2 1964 earthquake coseismic slip, postseismic deformation, slip from regional M  > 5 earthquakes, and the cumulative slip of previously detected slow slip events over the past 55 years. We investigate the deeper shallow depth (20–60 km) seismicity response to these perturbations using an epidemic type aftershock sequence model to describe earthquake‐to‐earthquake interactions. The statistical forecast captures the triggered seismicity during the 1983 M 6+ aftershocks in Columbia Bay but performs poorly during the slow slip event period between 1992.0 and 2004.8 that presents a statistically significant rate change (β , Z  > 2; M  < 4.0). We find that stress effects from the 1964 postseismic source and the 12‐year‐long slow slip event (~M 7.8) contribute to the 2018 Anchorage earthquake occurrence and that slow slip events modulate the deeper shallow depth seismicity patterns in the region.

Citation Information

Publication Year 2020
Title The role of seismic and slow slip events in triggering the 2018 M7.1 Anchorage earthquake in the Southcentral Alaska subduction zone
DOI 10.1029/2019GL086640
Authors Margarita Segou, Thomas E. Parsons
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title Geophysical Research Letters
Index ID 70209691
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center