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Updating the 2001 National Land Cover Database Impervious Surface Products to 2006 using Landsat imagery change detection methods

January 1, 2010

A prototype method was developed to update the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 2001 to a nominal date of 2006. NLCD 2001 is widely used as a baseline for national land cover and impervious cover conditions. To enable the updating of this database in an optimal manner, methods are designed to be accomplished by individual Landsat scene. Using conservative change thresholds based on land cover classes, areas of change and no-change were segregated from change vectors calculated from normalized Landsat scenes from 2001 and 2006. By sampling from NLCD 2001 impervious surface in unchanged areas, impervious surface predictions were estimated for changed areas within an urban extent defined by a companion land cover classification. Methods were developed and tested for national application across six study sites containing a variety of urban impervious surface. Results show the vast majority of impervious surface change associated with urban development was captured, with overall RMSE from 6.86 to 13.12% for these areas. Changes of urban development density were also evaluated by characterizing the categories of change by percentile for impervious surface. This prototype method provides a relatively low cost, flexible approach to generate updated impervious surface using NLCD 2001 as the baseline.

Citation Information

Publication Year 2010
Title Updating the 2001 National Land Cover Database Impervious Surface Products to 2006 using Landsat imagery change detection methods
DOI 10.1016/j.rse.2010.02.018
Authors George Xian, Collin G. Homer
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title Remote Sensing of Environment
Series Number
Index ID 70037231
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center