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Fire

Fire seasons are becoming longer and more intense across the United States, particularly in dry western regions. Other stressors are further compounding the risk and severity of wildfires, including the spread of highly flammable invasive species and more frequent and severe droughts. The CASC network works with partners to develop knowledge and tools to help better understand region-specific drivers of wildfires across the country and facilitate ecosystem recovery post-fire.  

Filter Total Items: 49

Landscape Management Practices on the Pueblo de San Ildefonso

The Pueblo de San Ildefonso is facing increased wildfire risk under climate change. Recent fires have not only burned culturally significant sites, but they have also resulted in a loss of watershed runoff retention, which has increased erosion and the transport of contaminated sediments and soils on Pueblo lands from the adjacent Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A priority for the Pueblo is
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Landscape Management Practices on the Pueblo de San Ildefonso

The Pueblo de San Ildefonso is facing increased wildfire risk under climate change. Recent fires have not only burned culturally significant sites, but they have also resulted in a loss of watershed runoff retention, which has increased erosion and the transport of contaminated sediments and soils on Pueblo lands from the adjacent Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A priority for the Pueblo is
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The Fire Within Us: Documenting Indigenous Relationships with Fire in Southern California/San Diego County

Since time immemorial, Indigenous peoples across California have maintained a relationship with fire to protect and care for the land. Utilizing burning practices passed down across generations fire was intentionally implemented to steward the landscape, cultivate food, fiber, and medicine, and reduce fuel loads that can set the stage for extreme fire events. Suppressive western fire management pr
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The Fire Within Us: Documenting Indigenous Relationships with Fire in Southern California/San Diego County

Since time immemorial, Indigenous peoples across California have maintained a relationship with fire to protect and care for the land. Utilizing burning practices passed down across generations fire was intentionally implemented to steward the landscape, cultivate food, fiber, and medicine, and reduce fuel loads that can set the stage for extreme fire events. Suppressive western fire management pr
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Webinar: Response of Big Sagebrush Plant Communities to Climate Change, Grazing, and Cheatgrass Throughout the 21st Century

View this webinar to learn how warming and changing landscapes will affect big sagebrush plant communities.
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Tracking Forest and Hydrological Resilience to Compound Stressors in Burned Forests Under a Changing Climate

In the Northern Rockies, the annual area burned by wildfires has risen sharply in recent decades and is expected to continue growing. As a result, burned forests increasingly comprise a significant portion of the land base. However, burned areas represent a difficult paradox for land managers, especially in the context of other climate-linked disturbances (e.g., droughts, bark beetle outbreaks) th
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Tracking Forest and Hydrological Resilience to Compound Stressors in Burned Forests Under a Changing Climate

In the Northern Rockies, the annual area burned by wildfires has risen sharply in recent decades and is expected to continue growing. As a result, burned forests increasingly comprise a significant portion of the land base. However, burned areas represent a difficult paradox for land managers, especially in the context of other climate-linked disturbances (e.g., droughts, bark beetle outbreaks) th
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Cultural Burning as a Climate Adaptation Strategy

There is increasing and broad recognition of the importance of Indigenous and local knowledge in leading climate change adaptation. Indigenous peoples and nations are on the front lines of climate change impacts, yet they are also leading the way in many innovative adaptation actions, such as traditional or cultural burning practices - a form of low-intensity understory-burning that promotes ecosy
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Cultural Burning as a Climate Adaptation Strategy

There is increasing and broad recognition of the importance of Indigenous and local knowledge in leading climate change adaptation. Indigenous peoples and nations are on the front lines of climate change impacts, yet they are also leading the way in many innovative adaptation actions, such as traditional or cultural burning practices - a form of low-intensity understory-burning that promotes ecosy
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Creating a North Central Regional Invasive Species and Climate Change (NC RISCC) Management Network

Natural resource managers consistently identify invasive species as one of the biggest challenges for ecological adaptation to climate change. Yet climate change is often not considered during their management decision making. Given the many ways that invasive species and climate change will interact, such as changing fire regimes and facilitating the migration of high priority species, it is more
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Creating a North Central Regional Invasive Species and Climate Change (NC RISCC) Management Network

Natural resource managers consistently identify invasive species as one of the biggest challenges for ecological adaptation to climate change. Yet climate change is often not considered during their management decision making. Given the many ways that invasive species and climate change will interact, such as changing fire regimes and facilitating the migration of high priority species, it is more
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Determining Successful Management and Restoration Strategies for Pinyon-Juniper Communities in the Face of Changing Climate and Wildfire

Pinyon-juniper woodlands are important ecosystems in the western U.S. that provide numerous critical environmental, economic, and cultural benefits. For example, pinyon pines are a significant cultural resource for multiple Native American Tribes and provide necessary habitat for plants and wildlife (including at risk species, such as the pinyon-jay). Despite their importance, stress put on pinyon
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Determining Successful Management and Restoration Strategies for Pinyon-Juniper Communities in the Face of Changing Climate and Wildfire

Pinyon-juniper woodlands are important ecosystems in the western U.S. that provide numerous critical environmental, economic, and cultural benefits. For example, pinyon pines are a significant cultural resource for multiple Native American Tribes and provide necessary habitat for plants and wildlife (including at risk species, such as the pinyon-jay). Despite their importance, stress put on pinyon
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Drought and Disturbances as Drivers of Long-Term Ecological Transformation and Risk

Forested areas in the Western U.S. that are impacted by disturbances such as fire and drought have increased in recent decades. This trend is likely to continue, with the increase in frequency and extent of wildfire activity being especially concerning. Resource managers need reliable scientific information to better understand wildfire occurrence, which can vary substantially across landscapes an
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Drought and Disturbances as Drivers of Long-Term Ecological Transformation and Risk

Forested areas in the Western U.S. that are impacted by disturbances such as fire and drought have increased in recent decades. This trend is likely to continue, with the increase in frequency and extent of wildfire activity being especially concerning. Resource managers need reliable scientific information to better understand wildfire occurrence, which can vary substantially across landscapes an
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Designing Climate-Resilient Habitat for At-Risk Species in the Southern Sierra Nevada Forest

Climate change adaptation research has made major advances over the last decade. For example, much is known about the impacts of climate change, many novel adaptation planning approaches have been developed, decision tools have become ubiquitous, and many novel adaptation options have been proposed. However, additional research is needed to demonstrate how these adaptation planning schemes can tra
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Designing Climate-Resilient Habitat for At-Risk Species in the Southern Sierra Nevada Forest

Climate change adaptation research has made major advances over the last decade. For example, much is known about the impacts of climate change, many novel adaptation planning approaches have been developed, decision tools have become ubiquitous, and many novel adaptation options have been proposed. However, additional research is needed to demonstrate how these adaptation planning schemes can tra
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Future of Fire: Towards a National Synthesis of Wildland Fire Under a Changing Climate

Abundant scientific research has characterized the relationships between climate and fire in ecosystems of the United States, and there is substantial evidence that the role of fire in ecosystems is likely to change with a changing climate. However, there is considerable local-to-regional heterogeneity in the observed and projected changes, driven by the historical and current patterns in fuel ava
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Future of Fire: Towards a National Synthesis of Wildland Fire Under a Changing Climate

Abundant scientific research has characterized the relationships between climate and fire in ecosystems of the United States, and there is substantial evidence that the role of fire in ecosystems is likely to change with a changing climate. However, there is considerable local-to-regional heterogeneity in the observed and projected changes, driven by the historical and current patterns in fuel ava
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A Climate-Informed Adaptation and Post-Fire Strategy for the Southwestern Region

The Southwest is projected to face significant climate challenges in coming decades; and many of these stresses have already begun. In recent years, multiple climate assessments have been developed for the Southwest that corroborate forecasts of remarkable change to vegetation pattern and the vulnerability of regional ecosystems and suggest that measurable change is already ongoing. Disturbance ev
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A Climate-Informed Adaptation and Post-Fire Strategy for the Southwestern Region

The Southwest is projected to face significant climate challenges in coming decades; and many of these stresses have already begun. In recent years, multiple climate assessments have been developed for the Southwest that corroborate forecasts of remarkable change to vegetation pattern and the vulnerability of regional ecosystems and suggest that measurable change is already ongoing. Disturbance ev
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Understanding Impacts on Southeastern Grasslands from Climate Change, Urban Expansion, and Invasive Species

Much of the biodiversity of the southeastern U.S. is found in grasslands, including meadows, prairies, glades, and savannas. These grasslands provide vital habitat to a variety of plants and animals, but many grassland types have undergone over 90% loss due to fire suppression and urban sprawl. The remaining grassland patches—remnants—now face emerging threats from invasive species and climate cha...
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Understanding Impacts on Southeastern Grasslands from Climate Change, Urban Expansion, and Invasive Species

Much of the biodiversity of the southeastern U.S. is found in grasslands, including meadows, prairies, glades, and savannas. These grasslands provide vital habitat to a variety of plants and animals, but many grassland types have undergone over 90% loss due to fire suppression and urban sprawl. The remaining grassland patches—remnants—now face emerging threats from invasive species and climate cha...
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