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Keys Carbonate Budget Calculations and Analysis

September 8, 2022

The code 'Keys Carbonate Budget Calculations', written in R (v.4.0.4; https://www.R-project.org/), uses benthic coral-reef survey data and fish survey data to calculate coral-reef carbonate budgets following the ReefBudget v2 methodology (http://geography.exeter.ac.uk/reefbudget/; Perry and Lange, 2019). The carbonate budgets include estimates (means +/- standard errors) of gross carbonate production by calcifying reef taxa and bioerosion by parrotfishes, urchins, clionid sponges, and microbioeroders. These metrics are combined to estimate net carbonate production and reef accretion. The 'Keys Carbonate Budget Calculations_old' is the same as 'Keys Carbonate Budget Calculations' except that it uses the ReefBudget v1 methodology for calculating parrotfish bioerosion (http://geography.exeter.ac.uk/reefbudget/; Perry and others, 2012). The outputs of 'Keys Carbonate Budget Calculations' and 'Keys Carbonate Budget Calculations_old' are visualized in summary graphs and analyzed statistically in the R code 'Keys Carbonate Budget Analysis'. Toth and others (2022) provide an interpretive publication based on these analyses. Although the codes are currently written to use benthic survey data from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Coral Reef Evaluation and Monitoring Project (CREMP; https://myfwc.com/research/habitat/coral/cremp/) and Rapid Visual Census fish survey data (https://grunt.sefsc.noaa.gov/rvc_analysis20/) managed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), it could be modified to calculate carbonate budgets from using any reef survey data with similar formats and parameters.

Citation Information

Publication Year 2022
Title Keys Carbonate Budget Calculations and Analysis
DOI 10.5066/P9APPZHJ
Authors Toth Lauren T, Courtney Travis A
Product Type Software Release
Record Source USGS Digital Object Identifier Catalog
USGS Organization St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center