David A Eads, Ph.D.

David Eads is an ecologist with the Fort Collins Science Center. David's research includes aspects of disease ecology, behavioral ecology, predator-prey relationships, and experimental biology.

Biography

David Eads is an ecologist with the Fort Collins Science Center. David's research includes aspects of disease ecology, behavioral ecology, predator-prey relationships, and experimental biology. Most investigations are motivated by applied conservation and efforts to recover federally listed species. Taxa of interest have included carnivores (e.g., black-footed ferrets, badgers, coyotes), rodents (e.g., prairie dogs, squirrels, mice), arthropods (e.g., fleas, lice, ticks, mites), and bacteria (Yersinia pestis). Ongoing research concentrates on plague and its chronic effects on wildlife and ecosystems, and methods of effective plague mitigation.

Education

  • Ph.D. Ecology, Colorado State University, 2014
  • M.S. Wildlife Sciences, University of Missouri, 2009
  • B.A. Psychology, Purdue University, 2007

Science

  • Grassland Ecology and Conservation - Grasslands are arguably one of the most anthropogenically stressed ecosystems of the western United States. Active research projects concentrate on evaluating and identifying methods for protecting and boosting populations of federally listed species, including the highly endangered black-footed ferret and several species of prairie dogs, all of which epitomize grassland mammals of ecological and conservation concern.
  • Species Conservation - Large scale changes are occurring to our natural landscapes, often resulting in changes to the distribution and abundance of species living within these landscapes. Populations of many species affected by these natural or anthropogenic changes require focused management . Several ongoing projects aim to ensure conservation of imperiled species, such as black-footed ferrets, Utah prairie dogs, and Peñasco least chipmunks.