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National Wildlife Health Center

Welcome to the National Wildlife Health Center! Our mission is to advance wildlife health science for the benefit of animals, humans, and the environment.

Explore SCIENCE to learn more about wildlife diseases, ongoing projects, the Honolulu Field Station, and our services.

Explore WEB TOOLS to access WHISPers, wildlife health bulletins, our field manual, and more.

News

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Pathology Case of the Month - Little Brown Bat

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Pathology Case of the Month - Cooper’s Hawk

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New resource on pathology and infectious agents of freshwater mussels

Publications

Serologic Survey of Selected Arthropod Borne Pathogens in Free-ranging Snowshoe Hares (Lepus americanus) Captured in Northern Michigan, USA

Snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) in the Upper Peninsula (UP) of Michigan occupy the southern range periphery and are vulnerable to climate change. In the eastern UP hares are isolated by the Great Lakes potentially exacerbating exposure to climate change induced habitat alterations. Climate change is also measurably affecting distribution and prevalence of vector-borne pathogens in North America a
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Erik K. Hofmeister, Melissa Lund, Daniel A. Grear, Eric Clark

Chronic wasting disease: State of the science

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a prion disease affecting cervid species, both free-ranging and captive populations. As the geographic range continues to expand and disease prevalence continues to increase, CWD will have an impact on cervid populations, local economies, and ecosystem health. Mitigation of this “wicked” disease will require input from many different stakeholders including hunters,
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Jason Bartz, Rebeca Benavente, Byron Caughey, Sonja Christensen, Allen Jeffrey Herbst, Ed Hoover, Candace K Mathiason, Debbie I. McKenzie, Rodrigo Morales, Marc D. Schwabenlander, Daniel P. Walsh, NC1209: North American interdisciplinary chronic wasting disease research consortium members

Chytrid infections exhibit historical spread and contemporary seasonality in a declining stream-breeding frog

Species with extensive geographical ranges pose special challenges to assessing drivers of wildlife disease, necessitating collaborative and large-scale analyses. The imperilled foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana boylii) inhabits a wide geographical range and variable conditions in rivers of California and Oregon (USA), and is considered threatened by the pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd
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A.M. Belasen, R.A. Peek, A.J. Adams, I.D. Russell, M.E. De León, Michael J. Adams, J. Bettaso, K.G.H. Breedveld, A. Catenazzi, C.P. Dillingham, Daniel A. Grear, Brian J. Halstead, P.G. Johnson, Patrick M. Kleeman, M.S. Koo, C.W. Koppl, J.D. Lauder, G. Padgett-Flohr, J. Piovia-Scott, K.L. Pope, V. Vredenburg, M. Westphal, K. Wiseman, S.J. Kupferberg

Science

Expanding Distribution of Chronic Wasting Disease

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) has been detected in 32 US states and five Canadian provinces in free-ranging cervids and/or commercial captive cervid facilities. CWD has been detected in free-ranging cervids in 32 states and four provinces and in captive cervid facilities in 19 states and three provinces.
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Expanding Distribution of Chronic Wasting Disease

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) has been detected in 32 US states and five Canadian provinces in free-ranging cervids and/or commercial captive cervid facilities. CWD has been detected in free-ranging cervids in 32 states and four provinces and in captive cervid facilities in 19 states and three provinces.
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Application of a systems approach for management of chronic wasting disease

The USGS National Wildlife Health Center, Montana Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, Ventana Systems, Inc. , and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WIDNR) are applying a systems approach to map and model the complex relationships among ecological, epidemiological, social, and political processes affecting CWD. Through a participatory modeling process, we gathered subject matter...
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Application of a systems approach for management of chronic wasting disease

The USGS National Wildlife Health Center, Montana Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, Ventana Systems, Inc. , and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WIDNR) are applying a systems approach to map and model the complex relationships among ecological, epidemiological, social, and political processes affecting CWD. Through a participatory modeling process, we gathered subject matter...
Learn More

Investigating coronaviruses and white-nose syndrome fungus in free-ranging North American bats

The USGS National Wildlife Health Center, using samples collected by state, federal, and tribal partners as part of the white-nose syndrome/Pd fungus surveillance, assessed the genetic diversity of bat coronaviruses in North America.
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Investigating coronaviruses and white-nose syndrome fungus in free-ranging North American bats

The USGS National Wildlife Health Center, using samples collected by state, federal, and tribal partners as part of the white-nose syndrome/Pd fungus surveillance, assessed the genetic diversity of bat coronaviruses in North America.
Learn More