National Wildlife Health Center

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Welcome to the National Wildlife Health Center! Our mission is to advance wildlife health science for the benefit of animals, humans, and the environment.

Explore Science to learn more about wildlife diseases, ongoing projects, the Honolulu Field Station, and services.

Explore Data and Tools to use WHISPers, wildlife bulletins, our field manual, CWD surveillance app, and more.

Index of Wildlife Disease Information Resources

Disease Investigation Services

Disease Investigation Services

Report mortality events and submit specimens.

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Science Spotlight: Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus 2

Science Spotlight: Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus 2

Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus 2 (RHDV2) has been confirmed for the first time in wild rabbits in the United States.

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Honolulu Field Station

Honolulu Field Station

The NWHC HFS provides support to the natural resource communities of Hawaii and the Pacific Basin in the investigation of wildlife diseases.

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News

Date published: November 1, 2020

Pathology Case of the Month - Northern Pintail Duck

Case History: An adult male Northern Pintail Duck (Anas acuta) was found dead on a refuge in Arizona, US. Collectively at this location, 29 birds including Snow Geese (Chen caerulescens), Canada Geese (Branta canadensis), Mallard Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos), and Northern Pintail Ducks (Anas acuta) were found dead with no reported...

Date published: October 1, 2020

Pathology case of the month - Mountain Cottontail

Case History: In June 2020, one adult female, 950-g, mountain cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus nuttallii) with bloody nasal discharge was found dead by a private landowner in Montana, U.S.A. and submitted frozen for cause of death determination. Two juvenile rabbits were found dead in proximity.

Publications

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Year Published: 2020

Skin fungal assemblages of bats vary based on susceptibility to white-nose syndrome

Microbial skin assemblages, including fungal communities, can influence host resistance to infectious diseases. The diversity-invasibility hypothesis predicts that high-diversity communities are less easily invaded than species-poor communities, and thus diverse microbial communities may prevent pathogens from colonizing a host. To explore the...

Vanderwolf, Karen J; Campbell, Lewis; Goldberg, Tony L; Blehert, David S.; Lorch, Jeffrey M.

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Year Published: 2020

Principles and mechanisms of wildlife population persistence in the face of disease

Emerging infectious diseases can result in species declines and hamper recovery efforts for at-risk populations. Generalizing considerations for reducing the risk of pathogen introduction and mitigating the effects of disease remains challenging and inhibits our ability to provide guidance for species recovery planning. Given the growing rates of...

Russell, Robin E.; Direnzo, Graziella Vittoria; Szymanski, J.; Alger, Katrina Elizabeth; Campbell Grant, Evan H.

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Year Published: 2020

Investigation of the 2018 thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia) die-off on St. Lawrence Island rules out food shortage as the cause

Die-offs of seabirds in Alaska have occurred with increased frequency since 2015. In 2018, on St. Lawrence Island, seabirds were reported washing up dead on beaches starting in late May, peaking in June, and continuing until early August. The cause of death was documented to be starvation, leading to the conclusion that a severe food shortage was...

Will, Alexis; Thiebot, Jean-Baptiste; Ip, Hon S.; Shoogukwruk, Panguk; Annogiyuk, Morgan; Takahashi, Akinori; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Killian, Mary-Lea; Torchetti, Mia Kim; Kitaysky, Alexander