National Wildlife Health Center

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Welcome to the National Wildlife Health Center! Our mission is to advance wildlife health science for the benefit of animals, humans, and the environment.

Explore Science to learn more about wildlife diseases, ongoing projects, the Honolulu Field Station, and services.

Explore Data and Tools to use WHISPers, wildlife bulletins, our field manual, CWD surveillance app, and more.

Index of Wildlife Disease Information Resources

Disease Investigation Services

Disease Investigation Services

Report mortality events and submit specimens.

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Science Spotlight - Chronic Wasting Disease

Science Spotlight - Chronic Wasting Disease

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging infectious disease that is fatal to free-ranging and captive animals in Cervidae, the deer family. 

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Honolulu Field Station

Honolulu Field Station

The NWHC HFS provides support to the natural resource communities of Hawaii and the Pacific Basin in the investigation of wildlife diseases.

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News

Date published: January 31, 2020

Pathology Case of the Month - Muskrats

Case History: Over a two-week period in November 2017, approximately 20 muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus) were found dead in a managed wetland in Ohio, USA. 

Date published: January 2, 2020

Pathology Case of the Month - Gyrfalcon

Case History:  A captive, adult male, 930-g Gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) was found dead in its enclosure on December 8, 2014.

Date published: December 16, 2019

National Wildlife Health Center Newsletter December 2019

View and download the newsletter (PDF).

Publications

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Year Published: 2020

Extreme mortality and reproductive failure of common murres resulting from the northeast Pacific marine heatwave of 2014-2016

About 62,000 dead or dying common murres (Uria aalge), the trophically dominant fish-eating seabird of the North Pacific, washed ashore between summer 2015 and spring 2016 on beaches from California to Alaska. Most birds were severely emaciated and, so far, no evidence for anything other than starvation was found to explain this mass mortality....

Piatt, John F.; Parrish, Julia K.; Renner, Heather M.; Schoen, Sarah K.; Jones, Timothy; Arimitsu, Mayumi L.; Kuletz, Kathy J.; Bodenstein, Barbara; Garcia-Reyes, Marisol; Duerr, Rebecca; Corcoran, Robin; Kaler, Robb S.A.; McChesney, Gerard J.; Golightly, Richard T.; Coletti, Heather A.; Suryan, Robert M.; Burgess, Hillary K.; Lindsey, Jackie; Lindquist, Kirsten; Warzybok, Peter; Jahncke, Jaime; Roletto, Jan; Sydeman, William J.

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Year Published: 2020

Successful molecular detection studies require clear communication among diverse research partners

Molecular detection techniques are powerful tools used in ecological applications ranging from diet analyses to pathogen surveillance. Research partnerships that use these tools often involve collaboration among professionals with expertise in field biology, laboratory techniques, quantitative modeling, wildlife disease, and natural resource...

Mosher, B. A.; Bernard, R. F.; Lorch, Jeffrey M.; Miller, D. A. W.; Richgels, Katherine L. D.; White, C. LeAnn; Campbell Grant, Evan H.

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Year Published: 2020

Rabies outbreak in captive big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) used in white-nose syndrome vaccine trial

An outbreak of rabies occurred in a captive colony of wild-caught big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus). Five of 27 bats exhibited signs of rabies virus infection 22–51 d after capture or 18–22 d after contact with the index case. Rabid bats showed weight loss, aggression, increased vocalization, hypersalivation, and refusal of food. Antigenic typing...

Abbott, Rachel C.; Saindon, L.G.; Falendysz, Elizabeth; Greenberg, Lauren; Orciari, L.A.; Satheshkumar, Panayampalli Subbian; Rocke, Tonie E.