USGS geologist discusses erosion at Fort Funston for ABC7 News segment on landslide fatality

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On Monday, February 25, 2019, research geologist Jonathan Warrick of the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center spoke with ABC7 News about a February 22 landslide that injured one woman and buried another at San Francisco’s Fort Funston beach.

USGS research geologist Jonathan Warrick leads a project that analyzed historical aerial photographs to measure cliff change at Fort Funston from 2002 to 2010. He described USGS research on rates of cliff erosion and why they are higher at Fort Funston. The interview, conducted over Facetime, was arranged in collaboration with the USGS Geology, Minerals, Energy and Geophysics Science Center and the Office of Communication and Publishing. It was used in an evening news segment and an online article posted later that day. Related stories also mention USGS work:

Three illustrations to show location of a study site, each labeled with distinctive areas, where there are high coastal cliffs.

Maps of the Fort Funston, California, study area, including (a) regional perspective and (b) local plan view. (c) Oblique shaded-relief map of Fort Funston study area showing the half-mile length of cliffs between beach access trail in the north and end of high cliff in the south. Also shown is the Oceanside Wastewater Treatment Plant (OWTP). Imagery from (b) NASA and (c) Google Earth.

(Public domain.)

 

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Date published: June 1, 2018
Status: Active

Remote Sensing Coastal Change

We use remote-sensing technologies—such as aerial photography, satellite imagery, and lidar (laser-based surveying)—to measure coastal change along U.S. shorelines.