USGS Seafloor-Mapping Expert Visits Korea Institute of Geology and Mineral Industries in South Korea

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USGS research geologist Sam Johnson was invited visit to the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Industries to present USGS expertise on offshore mapping.

Research geologist Sam Johnson of the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center made an invited visit to the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Industries (KIGAM) in Daejon, South Korea, from April 24 to 26, 2018. His host was Dr. Gee Soo Kong of the Petroleum and Marine Division, assisted by Drs. Deniz Cukur, Jae Hwa Jin, Kyong-O Kim, and Nam-Hyung Koo.

Johnson is a leader of the multi-agency California Seafloor Mapping Program, a project to develop bathymetric (seafloor depth), habitat, and geologic maps for all of California’s State Waters (mean high-water line out to 3 nautical miles). Support from partners in the federal, state, academic, and private sectors has led to one of the world’s largest and most comprehensive seafloor-mapping datasets. Johnson also investigates the composition and structure of rocks underlying the seabed, the forces that shape the coast and seafloor, and coastal earthquake, tsunami, and landslide hazards.

A group of men and women stand on the front steps of a building, smiling for the camera.

Sam Johnson (front row, third from left) with host Gee Soo Kong (front row, far left) and other staff from the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Industries (KIGAM) Petroleum and Marine Division.

A group of people face toward the background looking at a projection on the wall while a man talks about what is on the image.

USGS research geologist Sam Johnson presents a seminar on USGS offshore hazards research at the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Industries in Daejeon, South Korea.

During his visit to KIGAM, Johnson presented two seminars:
(1) The California Seafloor Mapping Program—History, Challenges, Applications, Lessons Learned; and
(2) U.S. Geological Survey Marine Geohazards Research, Central and Northern California.
He also toured KIGAM’s marine core (sediment sample) and laboratory facilities and learned about the institute’s plans for a new research vessel and a 3-D seismic-reflection system to image structures, like faults, in rock layers beneath the seafloor. Johnson enjoyed numerous stimulating discussions with KIGAM staff regarding seafloor mapping, active faults, and submarine landslides offshore of South Korea.

Johnson’s KIGAM hosts provided exceptional hospitality, including a great introduction to Korean food. Scientists from KIGAM have come to the Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center several times to discuss seafloor mapping and offshore hazards.

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Date published: June 29, 2018

Sound Waves Newsletter - June 2018

USGS hurricane response in 2017 helps prepare for 2018 season, and USGS researchers are ready; a special, USGS-led tsunami hazards issue of the journal Marine Geology receives award as one of the top three most-cited issues in 2016 and 2017; a USGS researcher visits South Korea to share expertise on offshore mapping; and more in this June 2018 issue of Sound Waves.