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Coastal Science

The USGS Texas Water Science Center monitors the water quality of coastal waters, estuaries, and major inflows to the coast. Texas Water Science Center also monitors storm surge suring tropical storms.

Filter Total Items: 5

Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council Monitoring and Assessment Program Development

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and USGS will jointly lead the development of foundational components for Gulf region-wide monitoring.
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Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council Monitoring and Assessment Program Development

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and USGS will jointly lead the development of foundational components for Gulf region-wide monitoring.
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Water Quality Monitoring at Offshore Artificial Reefs

USGS Texas Water Science Center scientists are collecting physical and chemical water properties at selected Texas artificial reefs to provide the initial foundation to establish the status and long-term trends in the environment and information essential for sound management decisions and long-term planning.
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Water Quality Monitoring at Offshore Artificial Reefs

USGS Texas Water Science Center scientists are collecting physical and chemical water properties at selected Texas artificial reefs to provide the initial foundation to establish the status and long-term trends in the environment and information essential for sound management decisions and long-term planning.
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RESTORE Act Activities in Texas

The USGS is collaborating with NOAA to develop tools to aid in an implementation strategy for integrated monitoring that will enable the RESTORE Council to meet its reporting requirements to Congress as well as to achieve the Councils goals, objectives, commitments and mission of science-based comprehensive Gulf ecosystem restoration.
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RESTORE Act Activities in Texas

The USGS is collaborating with NOAA to develop tools to aid in an implementation strategy for integrated monitoring that will enable the RESTORE Council to meet its reporting requirements to Congress as well as to achieve the Councils goals, objectives, commitments and mission of science-based comprehensive Gulf ecosystem restoration.
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Nutrient and Sediment Variability in the Lower San Jacinto River

The San Jacinto River is the second largest inflow into Galveston Bay. The USGS Texas Water Science Center collects water-quality samples in the lower reaches of the San Jacinto River over a range of hydrologic conditions to improve our understanding of the variability of nutrient and sediment concentrations in freshwater inflows from the San Jacinto River into Galveston Bay.
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Nutrient and Sediment Variability in the Lower San Jacinto River

The San Jacinto River is the second largest inflow into Galveston Bay. The USGS Texas Water Science Center collects water-quality samples in the lower reaches of the San Jacinto River over a range of hydrologic conditions to improve our understanding of the variability of nutrient and sediment concentrations in freshwater inflows from the San Jacinto River into Galveston Bay.
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Nutrient and Sediment Monitoring in Inflows to Texas Bays and Estuaries

The USGS Texas Water Science Center is evaluating the variability of nutrient and sediment concentrations and loads entering Texas bays and estuaries across a range of hydrologic conditions in Galveston Bay (inflow from the Trinity and San Jacinto Rivers), Matagordo Bay (inflow from the Colorado River), San Antonio Bay (inflow from the Guadalupe River), and Nueces Bay (inflow from Nueces River).
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Nutrient and Sediment Monitoring in Inflows to Texas Bays and Estuaries

The USGS Texas Water Science Center is evaluating the variability of nutrient and sediment concentrations and loads entering Texas bays and estuaries across a range of hydrologic conditions in Galveston Bay (inflow from the Trinity and San Jacinto Rivers), Matagordo Bay (inflow from the Colorado River), San Antonio Bay (inflow from the Guadalupe River), and Nueces Bay (inflow from Nueces River).
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