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Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center

Water information is fundamental to national and local economic well-being, protection of life and property, and effective management of water resources. USGS works with partners in Oklahoma and Texas to monitor, assess, conduct targeted research, and deliver information on a wide range of water resources including streamflow, groundwater, water quality, and water use and availability.

News

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OTWSC Webinar, Friday November 19th - Data Driven Applications

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OTWSC Webinar, Friday October 22nd - Wildfire and Water

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Online tool updated with new features to help Texans during flooding

Publications

Status of water-level altitudes and long-term water-level changes in the Chicot and Evangeline (undifferentiated) and Jasper aquifers, greater Houston area, Texas, 2021

Since the early 1900s, groundwater withdrawn from the primary aquifers that compose the Gulf Coast aquifer system—the Chicot and Evangeline (undifferentiated) and Jasper aquifers—has been the primary source of water in the greater Houston area, Texas. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District, City of Houston, Fort Bend Subside

Treatment of the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers as a single hydrogeologic unit and use of geostatistical interpolation methods to develop gridded surfaces of water-level altitudes and water-level changes in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers (undifferenti

The greater Houston area of Texas includes approximately 11,000 square miles and encompasses all or part of 11 counties (Harris, Galveston, Fort Bend, Montgomery, Brazoria, Chambers, Grimes, Liberty, San Jacinto, Walker, and Waller). From the early 1900s until the mid-1970s, groundwater withdrawn from the three primary aquifers that compose the Gulf Coast aquifer system—the Chicot, Evangeline, and

Mapping the altitude of the top of the Dockum Group and paleochannel analysis using surface geophysical methods on and near Cannon Air Force Base in Curry County, New Mexico, 2020

The hydrogeology on and near Cannon Air Force Base (AFB) in eastern New Mexico was assessed to gain a better understanding of preferential groundwater flow paths through paleochannels. In and near the study area, paleochannels incised the top surface of the Dockum Group (Chinle Formation) and were subsequently filled in with electrically resistive coarse-grained sediments of the overlying Ogallala

Science

Microplastics in Tributaries to Galveston Bay

Galveston Bay is the habitat of many organisms including many species of oysters, fish, and birds. USGS scientists from the Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center are conducting a study, in cooperation with the Galveston Bay Estuary Program, to assess the occurrence and abundance of microplastics (plastic particles smaller than 5 mm in diameter) in Galveston Bay and its tributaries.
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Microplastics in Tributaries to Galveston Bay

Galveston Bay is the habitat of many organisms including many species of oysters, fish, and birds. USGS scientists from the Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center are conducting a study, in cooperation with the Galveston Bay Estuary Program, to assess the occurrence and abundance of microplastics (plastic particles smaller than 5 mm in diameter) in Galveston Bay and its tributaries.
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Urban Waters Federal Partnership - Edwards Aquifer Recharge in a Developing Landscape

San Antonio Texas consistently ranks as one of the fastest growing large cities in the United States. Urban development can affect groundwater quality as trees and open space are replaced by buildings and roads, increasing the amount of urban runoff draining directly into the Edwards aquifer. A network of sophisticated surface water and groundwater monitoring sites is being used to help managers...
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Urban Waters Federal Partnership - Edwards Aquifer Recharge in a Developing Landscape

San Antonio Texas consistently ranks as one of the fastest growing large cities in the United States. Urban development can affect groundwater quality as trees and open space are replaced by buildings and roads, increasing the amount of urban runoff draining directly into the Edwards aquifer. A network of sophisticated surface water and groundwater monitoring sites is being used to help managers...
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Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council Monitoring and Assessment Program Development

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and USGS will jointly lead the development of foundational components for Gulf region-wide monitoring.
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Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council Monitoring and Assessment Program Development

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and USGS will jointly lead the development of foundational components for Gulf region-wide monitoring.
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