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Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center

Water information is fundamental to national and local economic well-being, protection of life and property, and effective management of water resources. USGS works with partners in Oklahoma and Texas to monitor, assess, conduct targeted research, and deliver information on a wide range of water resources including streamflow, groundwater, water quality, and water use and availability.

News

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New USGS report provides insights into groundwater and subsidence in the Houston area

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OTWSC Webinar, Friday November 19th - Data Driven Applications

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OTWSC Webinar, Friday October 22nd - Wildfire and Water

Publications

A model of transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity from electrical resistivity distribution derived from airborne electromagnetic surveys of the Mississippi River Valley Alluvial Aquifer, Midwest USA

Groundwater-flow models require the spatial distribution of the hydraulic conductivity parameter. One approach to defining this spatial distribution in groundwater-flow model grids is to map the electrical resistivity distribution by airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey and establish a petrophysical relation between mean resistivity calculated as a nonlinear function of the resistivity layering a

Hydrogeology, land-surface subsidence, and documentation of the Gulf Coast Land Subsidence and Groundwater-Flow (GULF) model, southeast Texas, 1897–2018

Executive SummaryAs a part of the Texas Water Development Board groundwater availability modeling program, the U.S. Geological Survey developed the Gulf Coast Land Subsidence and Groundwater-Flow model (hereinafter, the “GULF model”) and ensemble to simulate groundwater flow and land-surface subsidence in the northern part of the Gulf Coast aquifer system (the study area) in Texas from predevelopm

Contaminant exposure and transport from three potential reuse waters within a single watershed

Global demand for safe and sustainable water supplies necessitates a better understanding of contaminant exposures in potential reuse waters. In this study, we compared exposures and load contributions to surface water from the discharge of three reuse waters (wastewater effluent, urban stormwater, and agricultural runoff). Results document substantial and varying organic-chemical contribution to

Science

Socio-Hydrology

The Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center Socio-Hydrology Team conducts interdisciplinary studies spanning socioeconomic, hydrologic and climate science. Applying qualitative and quantitative approaches, we help stakeholders identify and assess a suite of water and climate risks. Our methodology provides a means for water and natural resource managers to analyze and evaluate risks, vulnerability...
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Socio-Hydrology

The Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center Socio-Hydrology Team conducts interdisciplinary studies spanning socioeconomic, hydrologic and climate science. Applying qualitative and quantitative approaches, we help stakeholders identify and assess a suite of water and climate risks. Our methodology provides a means for water and natural resource managers to analyze and evaluate risks, vulnerability...
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Microplastics in Tributaries to Galveston Bay

Galveston Bay is the habitat of many organisms including many species of oysters, fish, and birds. USGS scientists from the Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center are conducting a study, in cooperation with the Galveston Bay Estuary Program, to assess the occurrence and abundance of microplastics (plastic particles smaller than 5 mm in diameter) in Galveston Bay and its tributaries.
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Microplastics in Tributaries to Galveston Bay

Galveston Bay is the habitat of many organisms including many species of oysters, fish, and birds. USGS scientists from the Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center are conducting a study, in cooperation with the Galveston Bay Estuary Program, to assess the occurrence and abundance of microplastics (plastic particles smaller than 5 mm in diameter) in Galveston Bay and its tributaries.
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Urban Waters Federal Partnership - Edwards Aquifer Recharge in a Developing Landscape

San Antonio Texas consistently ranks as one of the fastest growing large cities in the United States. Urban development can affect groundwater quality as trees and open space are replaced by buildings and roads, increasing the amount of urban runoff draining directly into the Edwards aquifer. A network of sophisticated surface water and groundwater monitoring sites is being used to help managers...
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Urban Waters Federal Partnership - Edwards Aquifer Recharge in a Developing Landscape

San Antonio Texas consistently ranks as one of the fastest growing large cities in the United States. Urban development can affect groundwater quality as trees and open space are replaced by buildings and roads, increasing the amount of urban runoff draining directly into the Edwards aquifer. A network of sophisticated surface water and groundwater monitoring sites is being used to help managers...
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