Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

News

Filter Total Items: 23
Date published: September 19, 2018

BBL Employee Spotlight: Craig “Tut” Tuthill

The BBL’s supply technician is recognized for 30 years of federal service

Date published: August 31, 2018

BBL Employee Spotlight: Chelsea Steinbrecher-Hoffmann

A brief biography on the newest member of the BBL team.

Date published: August 23, 2018

BBL collaborates with University of Baltimore

The BBL is collaborating with graduate students at the University of Baltimore to revise Reportband.gov and BANDIT software.

Date published: July 10, 2018

Ospreys Benefit as Contaminants Decrease in Delaware Estuary

Lower levels of environmental contaminants—including pesticides, flame retardants and other pollutants—were recently found in osprey eggs in the Delaware Estuary compared to those tested from the 1970s through the early 2000s. 

Date published: June 21, 2018

Leave No Trace this Summer as You Explore the Outdoors

With summer officially here, it’s a great time to explore the outdoors! As people go hiking, camping, wildlife viewing and engage in other recreation activities, there can be associated impacts on the natural environment.

Date published: March 1, 2018

Waterbirds at Risk in the Chesapeake Bay

Scientists investigate the impacts of shoreline armoring

Date published: December 12, 2017

Saving Salamanders: Vital to Ecosystem Health

Amphibians—the big-eyed, swimming-crawling-jumping-climbing group of water and land animals that includes frogs, toads, salamanders and worm-like caecilians—are the world’s most endangered vertebrates. 

Date published: July 18, 2017

Unusual Suspects: Diving Ducks and Avian influenza

Due to the global threat to health and human safety posed by avian influenza monitoring has been conducted in the United States to determine the prevalence of such viruses in our wild waterfowl.

Date published: April 11, 2017

Florida Manatees Likely to Persist For At Least 100 Years—US Geological Survey  

Florida’s iconic manatee population is highly likely to endure for the next 100 years, so long as wildlife managers continue to protect the marine mammals and their habitat, a new study by the US Geological Survey and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute has found.

Date published: April 11, 2017

Media Inquiries on USGS Manatee Research

We appreciate your interest in USGS' Sirenia Project. To help inform members of the media and public, we have provided relevant publications, reports, and websites. 

Date published: April 3, 2017

New Costa Rican Shrew Species Named From a Single Specimen Found 44 Years Ago

“Think of a lion shrunk to the size of a mouse that needs to eat every 20 minutes or so.” That is a shrew, says Neal Woodman, a U.S. Geological Survey mammalogist who is curator of mammals at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. “Shrews are predators with very high metabolisms, hence their reputation for fierceness.”