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New booklet from the St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center designed to provide a glimpse into the research conducted by the USGS in St. Petersburg, Florida.

This article is part of the November-December 2021 issue of the Sound Waves newsletter.

 

If you were driving through downtown St. Petersburg and passed the antique red brick building at the corner of 4th Street and 6th Avenue South, you likely wouldn’t believe it to be a federal science building. Nestled within the St. Petersburg Innovation District and appropriately positioned within the local hub of marine science institutions, these bricks host a staff of about 100 people working to study coastal and marine environments to help the Nation prepare for a changing world.

A brick building with blue trimmed windows and a blue sky
This historic brick Studebaker Building, originally built in 1925, was chosen as the location for the USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center in the late 1980's. Many of the building’s original features are kept in tact to this day, including the Studebaker logos along the top of the building, and the Studebaker Distributor sign on the back of the building that is maintained in spirit of the building’s history. The building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on July 5, 1985 and the St. Petersburg Register of Historic Places in 1986. Learn about the science at the USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center.

 

A new booklet, Coastal and Marine Science of the U.S. Geological Survey in St. Petersburg, Florida, summarizes the robust coastal and marine research being conducted by staff at the USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center and shared with partners and stakeholders across the Nation. SPCMSC scientists study topics as diverse as hurricane and sea-level rise impacts to coastlines, geologic history of barrier islands, climate change history, effects of ocean acidification, and the microbial ecology and growth rates of corals—topics you’d likely not guess were being studied behind those antique brick walls.

 

two scuba divers on the surface of clear blue water over a coral reef with a lighthouse in the background
Studying microbiomes of corals at Loggerhead Key, Dry Tortugas, Florida.
A man kneels in a grassy marsh shoreline with a boat in the water behind him.
Measuring tidal inundation in a marsh shoreline in Grand Bay, Mississippi.
Two women looking through microscopes in a lab.
Examining  foraminifera from the Gulf of Mexico while at sea on the R/V Pelican.

 

Complete with stunning field photos, a little bit of history, details about each of our science topics, and links to helpful resources, this General Information Product (GIP) will take you on an entertaining and informative journey to get to know the “USGS St. Pete,” as we call it here in Florida.

This booklet could not have been possible without inspiration from our sister center, the Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center who designed a beautiful GIP of their own in 2019—thank you Sara Ernst and team for lighting the path for us. We also thank the numerous center staff, John Haines, Dianna Hogan, and the Pembroke Science Publishing Network team for reviewing and editing the GIP along the way.

 

Have fun exploring!

Coastal and Marine Science of the U.S. Geological Survey in St. Petersburg, Florida

 

cover of a booklet with a photo of a beach. "Coastal and Marine Science of the U.S. Geological Survey in St. Petersburg, FL
New booklet, Coastal and Marine Science of the U.S. Geological Survey in St. Petersburg, Florida, was designed to provide a glimpse into the research conducted by the USGS in St. Petersburg, Florida.