Science Center Objects

The marsh in China Camp State Park is located on the western side of San Pablo Bay and covers 97 hectares. We surveyed 753 elevation points and 423 vegetation plots to determine baseline conditions of the marsh. Water level loggers deployed in 2010 were used to characterize the tidal inundation patterns throughout the year. Sediment accretion rates from soil cores were used as input for the WARMER sea-level rise response model. WARMER projects that by 2060 China Camp marsh will be dominated by low marsh vegetation and will transition into mudflat habitat by 2090. 

The marsh in China Camp State Park is located on the western side of San Pablo Bay and covers 97 hectares. We surveyed 753 elevation points and 423 vegetation plots to determine baseline conditions of the marsh. Water level loggers deployed in 2010 were used to characterize the tidal inundation patterns throughout the year. Sediment accretion rates from soil cores were used as input for the WARMER sea-level rise response model. WARMER projects that by 2060 China Camp marsh will be dominated by low marsh vegetation and will transition into mudflat habitat by 2090. 

CHINA CAMP MARSH

WERC China Camp study area
(Public domain.)
WERC China Camp figures
The elevation histogram for China Camp Marsh shows the marsh platform is above MHW on average (Fig. 1). Data from the vegetation surveys indicate relatively high species richness (Fig. 2). Results from WARMER response model indicate that China Camp will lose relative elevation as sea levels rise (Fig. 3). The marsh platform at China Camp Marsh is projected to transition to low marsh habitat by 2060 and be below mean sea level by 2090 (Fig. 4). The percent of time China Camp Marsh is inundated varies throughout the year by season, with the most inundation during the winter (Fig. 5). (Public domain.)
WERC China Camp WARMER results
(Public domain.)

To download the China Camp PDF Summary Report (Chinap Camp appendix from USGS Open-File Report Final report for sea-level rise response modeling for San Francisco Bay estuary tidal marshes):