What are some of the signs of climate change?

• Temperatures are rising world-wide due to greenhouse gases trapping more heat in the atmosphere.

• Droughts are becoming longer and more extreme around the world.

• Tropical storms becoming more severe due to warmer ocean water temperatures.

• As temperatures rise there is less snowpack in mountain ranges and polar areas and the snow melts faster.

• Overall, glaciers are melting at a faster rate.

• Sea ice in the Arctic Ocean around the North Pole is melting faster with the warmer temperatures.

• Permafrost is melting, releasing methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, into the atmosphere.

• Sea levels are rising, threatening coastal communities and estuarine ecosystems.

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Filter Total Items: 15
Date published: September 7, 2007

Future Retreat of Arctic Sea Ice Will Lower Polar Bear Populations and Limit Their Distribution

Future reduction of sea ice in the Arctic could result in a loss of 2/3 of the world's polar bear population within 50 years according to a series of studies released today by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Date published: May 11, 2007

Abrupt Climate Change: Causes and Ecosystem Responses

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists who study trends in climate change will be presenting the results from new studies at a workshop held in Pacific Grove, California, May 13-16, 2007.

Date published: May 29, 2002

Decline of World's Glaciers Expected to Have Global Impacts Over This Century

The great majority of the world’s glaciers appear to be declining at rates equal to or greater than long-established trends, according to early results from a joint NASA and United States Geological Survey (USGS) project designed to provide a global assessment of glaciers. At the same time, a small minority of glaciers are advancing.

Filter Total Items: 18
video thumbnail: USGS Public Lecture Series: Climate Change 101
August 24, 2009

USGS Public Lecture Series: Climate Change 101

Climate change is an issue of increasing public concern because of its potential effects on land, water, and biological resources. In the next several years, the United States will be challenged to make management and policy decisions as well as develop adaptation and mitigation strategies that will require anticipating the effects of a changing climate and its impacts on

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video thumbnail: USGS Public Lecture Series: Watching Nature's Clock: A Citizen-Scientist Effort to Track Seasonal Signs of Climate Change
May 5, 2009

USGS Public Lecture Series: Watching Nature's Clock: A Citizen-Scientist Effort to Track Seasonal Signs of Climate Change

A new USGS program, the USA National Phenology Network, is recruiting tens of thousands of volunteers to team up with scientists to help track the effects of climate on seasonal patterns of plant and animal behavior. Come learn how you can contribute to this new national effort, by getting outside, and observing and recording flowering, fruiting and other seasonal events.

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video thumbnail: Drew Point, AK Time-Lapse Photography of Coastal Erosion
June 5, 2008

Drew Point, AK Time-Lapse Photography of Coastal Erosion

4-week time-lapse photography of the Arctic coast at Drew Point, AK shows intense coastal erosion in early July, 2008

Erosion and climate change along Alaska's Arctic Coast
December 31, 1969

Erosion and climate change along Alaska's Arctic Coast

Erosion and climate change along Alaska's Arctic Coast

Image: Vegetation Drought

Vegetation Drought

The Vegetation Drought Response Index (VegDRI) incorporates satellite observations of vegetation to monitor at a finer spatial detail than other commonly used drought indicators.

Attribution: Water Resources
Crumbling blocks of permafrost along the Beaufort Coast

Crumbling blocks of permafrost along the Beaufort Coast

Crumbling blocks of permafrost along the Beaufort Coast

Attribution: