Which states have the smallest number of earthquakes? Is there any place in the world that doesn't have earthquakes?

Florida and North Dakota are the states with the fewest earthquakes. Antarctica has the least earthquakes of any continent, but small earthquakes can occur anywhere in the World.

Our Earthquake Statistics website has M3+ earthquake counts for each state beginning in 2010.

Learn more: Earthquake Information by Region (scroll down for information by State/Territory).

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Where can I search an earthquake catalog for past events?

You may be able to find what you’re looking for using our collection of Earthquake Lists , so check that first. If that doesn’t work, you can use one of these Earthquake Catalog Search webpages: Search the World-wide Earthquakes Catalog (M4.5+ worldwide, M2.5+ U.S.) Search the ANSS (Advanced National Seismic System) Composite Catalog (M4.5+ world-...

Which country has the most earthquakes?

The answer to this question is not as straightforward as it may seem. In order to most accurately answer it, we will rephrase the question four different ways: For which country do we locate the most earthquakes? Japan. The whole country is in a very active seismic area, and they have the densest seismic network in the world, so they are able to...

Which state has the most damaging earthquakes? The most natural (non-manmade) earthquakes?

California has the most damaging earthquakes, and Alaska and California have the most natural (non-manmade) earthquakes. Find information about earthquakes in each state on our Earthquake Information by Region website (scroll down).

Where do earthquakes occur?

Earthquakes can strike any location at any time. But history shows they occur in the same general patterns year after year, principally in three large zones of the earth. The world's greatest earthquake belt, the circum-Pacific seismic belt , is found along the rim of the Pacific Ocean, where about 81 percent of the world's largest earthquakes...

Where can I find a list of the largest earthquakes in the United States? In the World?

The USGS Earthquake Lists, Maps, and Statistics website has statistics about earthquakes in the United States and the world, including a list of the world's 20 largest recorded earthquakes.

Where can I find a list of the largest earthquakes near my town?

Use our online earthquake catalog to search for past earthquakes in your region. Define your search area by drawing a rectangle on a map or by inputting data for a rectangle or circle. Go to our Earthquake Information by Region website and scroll down to find information about earthquakes in each state.

Where can I find a list of yearly estimated deaths from earthquakes around the world?

Our Earthquake Statistics website has annual totals for worldwide earthquakes and U.S. earthquakes from 1990 to the near-present. Estimated deaths from those earthquakes are listed at the bottom of the charts. The website also has M3+ earthquake counts by state beginning in 2010.
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Date published: June 26, 2014

New Audiences, New Products for the National Seismic Hazard Maps

New Audiences, New Products for the National Seismic Hazard Maps

Date published: January 8, 2010

Earthquakes Cause over 1700 Deaths in 2009

At least 1783 deaths worldwide resulted from earthquake activity in 2009.

The deadliest earthquake of the year was a magnitude 7.5 event that killed approximately 1117 people in southern Sumatra, Indonesia on Sept. 30, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and confirmed by the United Nations Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). 

Date published: January 3, 2008

Earthquakes claim 709 lives in 2007

At least 709 deaths resulted from earthquake activity worldwide in 2007, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and confirmed by the United Nations Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

Date published: February 10, 2005

2004 Deadliest in Nearly 500 Years for Earthquakes

According to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), 2004 was the deadliest year for earthquakes since the Renaissance Age, making it the second most fatal in recorded history, with more than 275,950 deaths reported from the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that hit the Indian Ocean on Dec. 26. 

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USGS Forecast for Ground Shaking Intensity from Natural and Induced Earthquakes in 2017
February 28, 2017

USGS Forecast for Ground Shaking Intensity from Earthquakes in 2017

USGS map displaying intensity of potential ground shaking from natural and human-induced earthquakes. There is a small chance (one percent) that ground shaking intensity will occur at this level or higher. There is a greater chance (99 percent) that ground shaking will be lower than what is displayed in these maps.

Damage to buildings in Cushing, Oklahoma from the magnitude 5.0 earthquake on November 6, 2016
February 24, 2017

Damage in Cushing, Oklahoma from the Magnitude 5.0 Earthquake in 2016

Damage to buildings in Cushing, Oklahoma from the magnitude 5.0 earthquake on November 6, 2016. Unreinforced brick and stone masonry buildings and facades are vulnerable to strong shaking. Photograph credit: Dolan Paris, USGS

Damage to buildings in Cushing, Oklahoma from the magnitude 5.0 earthquake in 2016
February 24, 2017

Damage in Cushing, Oklahoma from the Magnitude 5.0 Earthquake in 2016

Damage to buildings in Cushing, Oklahoma from the magnitude 5.0 earthquake on November 6, 2016. Unreinforced brick and stone masonry buildings and facades are vulnerable to strong shaking. Photograph credit: Dolan Paris, USGS

USGS Forecast for Damage from Natural and Induced Earthquakes in 2016
October 28, 2016

USGS Forecast for Damage from Natural and Induced Earthquakes in 2016

USGS map displaying potential to experience damage from a natural or human-induced earthquake in 2016. Chances range from less than one percent to 12 percent.

February 4, 2016

Sunset over South Florida WARC

Sunset over South Florida

East versus west earthquakes

East vs West Coast Earthquakes

Map of USGS “Did You Feel It?” data shows that earthquakes east of the Rocky Mountains are felt over larger areas than earthquakes in the West.