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Science for a Changing World

USGS scientists use innovative, state-of-the-art methods to understand the Earth. Our science is used by Federal, Tribal, State, and local agencies to solve increasingly complex problems facing resource managers. This site explores real-life examples of USGS science applied to societal challenges

News

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From sagebrush to trout, USGS bolsters conservation efforts through data, collaboration

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USGS Scientists Help Address Conflict Mining

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From the Seafloor to Outer Space, USGS is on the Case

Science

2023 50-State Long-term National Seismic Hazard Model

The 2023 50-State Update of the U.S. National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM) defines the potential for earthquake ground shaking for various probability levels across the conterminous United States, Alaska, and Hawaii and is applied in seismic provisions of building codes, insurance rate structures, risk assessments, and other public policy. The updated model represents an assessment of the best...
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2023 50-State Long-term National Seismic Hazard Model

The 2023 50-State Update of the U.S. National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM) defines the potential for earthquake ground shaking for various probability levels across the conterminous United States, Alaska, and Hawaii and is applied in seismic provisions of building codes, insurance rate structures, risk assessments, and other public policy. The updated model represents an assessment of the best...
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Wyoming Migration Initiative: Ungulate Migration in the West

Advancing the conservation and understanding of Wyoming's migratory hooved animals (mule deer, elk, pronghorn, etc.). The Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit is led by USGS federal researchers. The Wyoming Migration Initiative is a University of Wyoming’s Zoology and Physiology Department-based collaborative of biologists, photographers, mapmakers, and writers working to research...
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Wyoming Migration Initiative: Ungulate Migration in the West

Advancing the conservation and understanding of Wyoming's migratory hooved animals (mule deer, elk, pronghorn, etc.). The Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit is led by USGS federal researchers. The Wyoming Migration Initiative is a University of Wyoming’s Zoology and Physiology Department-based collaborative of biologists, photographers, mapmakers, and writers working to research...
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Development of Next Generation Techniques of fecal samples collected from nestling cactus wren

Coastal cactus wren populations have declined in southern California over the last three decades. In San Diego County, this decline has been especially noticeable in the Otay area, which in 2014 supported 14 territories on conserved lands. In the past, there were 25-53 active territories reported for this same area, with the highest estimate in 1992. There is also concern the number of active...
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Development of Next Generation Techniques of fecal samples collected from nestling cactus wren

Coastal cactus wren populations have declined in southern California over the last three decades. In San Diego County, this decline has been especially noticeable in the Otay area, which in 2014 supported 14 territories on conserved lands. In the past, there were 25-53 active territories reported for this same area, with the highest estimate in 1992. There is also concern the number of active...
Learn More