Example of chirp data

Two identical illustrations show the sediment layers under the seafloor, one as raw data and the other with interpretive labels.

Detailed Description

Illustration shows an example of the geophysical information collected from a chirp sub-bottom profiler. Top frame shows just the processed data, then the bottom frame shows a scientist's interpretations of the features. This is a cross-section showing the sediment layers under the seafloor. The acoustic pulses are emitted down towards the seafloor and bounce back to the chirp where the signal return speeds are recorded and telemetered to the ship-board computers. These signals are processed to produce this image, a cross-section of the seafloor. The speed of the return signal depends on the kind of sediment it penetrates on the seafloor, as well as the way that sub-surface is broken up. The seafloor is the top-most line, then the various shades of gray lines below that show different sediment surfaces under the seafloor. Geologic features such as sedimentary or rock layers, faults, and underwater landslides can be interpreted by scientists. The chirp sub-bottom profiler provides an unique perspective of the sub-surface; and when combined with other data such as bathymetry (depth) and underwater photos and video, allows scientists to more accurately interpret how faults are moving and where hazards may exist.

Details

Image Dimensions: 600 x 745

Location Taken: Monterey, CA, US

Source:

Investigation of Late Pleistocene and Holocene Activity in the San Gregorio Fault Zone on the Continental Slope North of ...
Katherine L. Maier, Charles K. Paull, Daniel S. Brothers, David W. Caress, Mary McGann, Eve M. Lundsten, Krystle Anderson, Roberto Gwiazda; Investigation of Late Pleistocene and Holocene Activity in the San Gregorio Fault Zone on the Continental Slope North of Monterey Canyon, Offshore Central California. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America ; 107 (3): 1094–1106. doi: 10.1785/0120160261