Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

News

Daily updates about ongoing eruptions, recent images and videos of summit volcanic activity, maps, and data about recent earthquakes in Hawaii are posted on the HVO website. 

Volcano Watch is a weekly article and activity update written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and colleagues.

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Date published: July 28, 2021

Photo and Video Chronology – Kīlauea – July 27, 2021

Field Work at Keller Well. Kīlauea's summit is no longer erupting; lava supply to the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake has ceased and sulfur dioxide emissions have decreased to near pre-eruption background levels. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor for new changes from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Date published: July 26, 2021

Photo and Video Chronology – Kīlauea – July 23, 2021

Kīlauea's summit is no longer erupting; lava supply to the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake has ceased and sulfur dioxide emissions have decreased to near pre-eruption background levels. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor for new changes from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Date published: July 23, 2021

New USGS Data Release — Unoccupied Aircraft Systems (UAS) video of the 2018 summit eruption of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii

The USGS recently published "Unoccupied Aircraft Systems (UAS) video of the 2018 summit eruption of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii." The Data Release contains Unoccupied Aircraft Systems (UAS) footage from the 2018 summit collapse of Kīlauea Volcano, Island of Hawai‘i. 

Date published: July 23, 2021

Photo and Video Chronology – Kīlauea – July 22, 2021

Kīlauea's summit is no longer erupting; lava supply to the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake has ceased and sulfur dioxide emissions have decreased to near pre-eruption background levels. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor for new changes from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Date published: July 22, 2021

Volcano Watch — Stressed out: Hawaiian volcanoes are heavy

Many people living in the Hawaiian Islands are accustomed to feeling occasional earthquakes since the State of Hawaii is one of the most seismically active locations in the United States. Unlike some other earthquake-prone places in the U.S., for example California, where the earthquakes are related to tectonic plates sliding past each other, our earthquakes are related to volcanoes.  

Date published: July 19, 2021

Photo and Video Chronology – Kīlauea – July 16, 2021

Kīlauea's summit is no longer erupting; lava supply to the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake has ceased and sulfur dioxide emissions have decreased to near pre-eruption background levels. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor for new changes from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Date published: July 15, 2021

Volcano Watch — Learning from the 1984 eruption of Mauna Loa

The most recent page in Mauna Loa’s eruptive history was written in 1984. The eruption began in March of 1984, about a decade after the 1975 summit eruption (the topic of last week’s “Volcano Watch” article). Here’s a quick look at how the eruption proceeded and its impacts on residents ...

Date published: July 12, 2021

Photo and Video Chronology – Kīlauea – July 9, 2021

Kīlauea's summit is no longer erupting; lava supply to the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake has ceased and sulfur dioxide emissions have decreased to near pre-eruption background levels. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor for new changes from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Date published: July 8, 2021

Volcano Watch — Remembering Mauna Loa’s eruption on July 5–6, 1975

Mauna Loa erupted forty-six years ago this week, on July 5–6, 1975, in a 20-hour event with vents confined to the summit region (the area above 3,660 m/12,000 ft) and lava flows descending to just below 3,170 m (10,400 ft). This was the first eruption in 25 years, at the time the longest quiet stretch since 1843 (we are currently in the longest stretch at 37 years and counting). 

Date published: July 7, 2021

USGS HVO Information Statement — Magnitude-4.2 earthquake west of the Island of Hawai‘i

A magnitude-4.2 earthquake located to the west of the Island of Hawai‘i, was reported by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) on Wednesday, July 7, 2021, at 7:41 a.m. HST.

Date published: July 5, 2021

USGS HVO Information Statement — Magnitude-5.2 earthquake north of Waipiʻo Valley, Island of Hawai‘i

A magnitude-5.2 earthquake located to the north of the Island of Hawai‘i, was recorded by the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) on July 5, at 1:43 p.m. HST.

Date published: July 1, 2021

Volcano Watch — Volcanoes in Canada, eh?

Happy Canada Day/Bonne Fête du Canada! While some past "Volcano Watch" articles have had a July 4th theme for the USA, this year we’re taking the opportunity to ensure readers know that our neighbors to the north have volcanoes, too—including potentially active ones.