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Andrea Woodward

I am an emerita Biologist at the U.S. Geological Survey. During my career I studied the interaction between large herbivores (elk and mountain goats) and vegetation, and the effects of climate change on subalpine vegetation. I also worked on designing ecological monitoring programs and protocols; and incorporating climate change into natural resource management plans.

As an emerita scientist, I have been finishing up a few projects that were not completed before I retired. These included two papers with co-authors describing long-term data sets: 36 years of research on old-growth forest structure based on data from elk exclosures and 28 years of data on subalpine fir seedling survival, both in Olympic National Park. I also completed with co-authors an implementation guide for decision tools meant to incorporate climate change into management decisions made by the USDA Forest Service. I am currently working on updating a field guide to mosses, lichens, and liverworts of the Pacific Northwest. I remain very interested in the curious distribution of cottonwoods in Olympic National Park and may pursue that a bit more before calling it a career.

Professional Experience

  • Ecologist, National Park Service Cooperative Parks Study Unit, Seattle, WA

  • Ecologist, National Park Service, Olympic National Park, WA (1990)

Education and Certifications

  • Ph.D., Cornell University (1988)

Affiliations and Memberships*

  • Northwest Scientific Association

Science and Products

*Disclaimer: Listing outside positions with professional scientific organizations on this Staff Profile are for informational purposes only and do not constitute an endorsement of those professional scientific organizations or their activities by the USGS, Department of the Interior, or U.S. Government